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Veg*n (or Veg*an) refers to both vegans and vegetarians. The use of the asterisk derives from its use in computer languages as a wildcard which can capture any sequence of characters. Wiktionary


15

This started as a reaction to a rant from one dairy lover who was offended by vegan cheese being called cheese. Excerpt from the rant suggesting the vegan cheese being called Gary: "Call it Gary or something just don't call it cheese because it's not cheese!" The relevant part of the rant as an image is here. The internet responded and so did the real ...


15

The term vegan was intended by those who coined it to encompass lifestyles that respect non-human animals and refrain from any exploitation of them. From The Vegan Society history page Although the vegan diet was defined early on it was as late as 1949 before Leslie J Cross pointed out that the society lacked a definition of veganism and he suggested ...


10

If you really want a word for this, I'll make one up for you. Call it entomophagous vegan. Entomophagous is the adjective for eating insects. You can also say plant and insect based diet. But there is no mainstream word for the diet you describe at least in the US or Australia. I symphathise with you as I have a very complicated diet (vegetarian with the ...


9

This non-standard spelling is used, in my opinion, because of the discomfort some vegans feel with the idea of dairy milk as food and the desire to distinguish vegan "milk"s from dairy milk, but also, the desire to see vegan m[iy]lk as a food in itself, not as a substitute for dairy milk. Many vegans are interested in effecting social/cultural change, and ...


7

This practice mirrors plant-based alternative products often sold under such (similar but recognizably different) names - for marketing or often legal reasons. In various localities, terms for certain foodstuffs are well defined in food codes and laws - even calling soy milk soy milk can cause trouble where "milk" is narrowly defined; any product bearing ...


6

Speaking only for my own locale - the UK - in general yes, but since it's open to interpretation, I ask to be sure. In my experience the term "cruelty-free" is most likely to be used for non-food items such as cosmetics, or non-leather shoes and bags. It is intended to express the fact that no animals have been harmed in making the item; it does not contain ...


6

Typically (at least in Europe and the Americas), although the definition varies, vegetarians are those who at least do not consume products made from the body of an animal that has been killed. This means avoiding: meat including poultry fish including shellfish gelatin cheese made with animal rennet alcoholic drinks made using products from dead animals ...


5

The term nooch as a nickname for nutritional yeast seems to have originated at the Post Punk Kitchen forum way back. I say seems because I was not able to find any absolutely trustworthy source for this, but I did find a couple of weak ones (Urban Dictionary entry for nooch; this site and also this Post Punk Kitchen forum post that wonders about people ...


5

I'm very careful with those type of labels as there are plenty of them and industries are likely to divert the real meaning of "cruelty-free" words on packaging. Fortunately, some organisations created more or less strict labels and to inform at best the consumer. Some of them certify that products are just not tested on animals, but don't guarantee that ...


2

"Flexitarian" can be used as a catch-all to describe any "almost" vegan/vegetarian diet. The only other term I've heard of that comes close is "beegan", to refer to a vegan to eats honey


1

I’d call it vegan (1988) or old-school vegan. The Vegan Society UK considered honey to be vegan at their founding and as recently as 1988. Yes, that’s the same society that has the word vegan registered as an international trademark. They were originally a spin-off from the vegetarian society with the addition of eggs and dairy as concerns. Most of us are ...


1

bee-tlegarian beegans eats honey, you mentioned eating insects, as a fortunate coincidence the word BEEtle includes Bee which is happy convenience. The "garian" suffix already indicates something that comes from agriculture so the word seems ok. Another possible word is bugvorousgarian


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