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15

This started as a reaction to a rant from one dairy lover who was offended by vegan cheese being called cheese. Excerpt from the rant suggesting the vegan cheese being called Gary: "Call it Gary or something just don't call it cheese because it's not cheese!" The relevant part of the rant as an image is here. The internet responded and so did the real ...


15

Below is a list of places where vegetarian Parmesan-like hard Italian-style cheeses can be found: Twineham Grange Vegetarian Pasta cheese from Bookhams is lovely and can be bought online and from Waitrose. The Better Food Company in Bristol stocks some tasty vegetarian-friendly Parmesan-like cheese. Whole Foods stores, which seem to be growing in number ...


14

You don't have to go to specialist stores; you can get vegetarian Parmesan in at least three of the major UK supermarkets! It seems to usually be under each supermarket's "budget" branding. I believe the reason for this is that "Parmesan" is a "DOP" name which means that it has a designated origin and legally has to be made in a particular region and with a ...


10

Yes, Marmite is vegan. Yeast is a type of microfungi and as such is not considered non-vegan or an animal product, just like any other kind of mushroom. Regarding yeast and veganism, there are already some answers in this thread.


10

click the pictures to go to a UK-based online supplier. Mr Organic Free From Chocolate Hazelnut Spread (cheapest & most like Nutella) Ingredients: Cane sugar, sunflower oil, Cocoa (16%), Hazelnut paste (12%), Rice Flour, Cocoa butter, Sunflower Lecithin Also available in independent health food stores Rawtella (sweetened with supersweet coconut blosson ...


9

There is vegetable rennet. You can get parmesan-style cheese with vegetable rennet. Here's a few: Organic Valley uses vegetable rennet in their shredded parmesan as well as their grated variety. Trader Joe's does sell parmesan with vegetable rennet (under the Trader Giotto's brand). They label their rennet source so you can check the label if you go there. ...


9

Actually I disagree with you that protein is a major obstacle to going vegan. It's everywhere! Grains and pulses are probably the cheapest protein-rich foods. Protein content in beans, peas and lentils when cooked varies from around 6 to 10%. Porridge oats contain about 20% protein, wheat flour around 11%, and cooked brown rice about 6.5% TVP ("textured ...


8

Marmite is vegan. However, if you are vegan because of the animal rights side of things, you should take into consideration that it is made by Unilever and they are heavily involved in animal testing. Most of the main supermarkets do a generic brand, all of which taste no different.


7

Here's a widely available vegan option: Violife Prosociano. It's sold in health-food shops and Tesco, and online for example at The Vegan Kind For those who prefer not to use processed foods, I find a combination of hemp seeds, nutritional yeast, garlic powder and salt does stand in for Parmesan quite convincingly.


6

I'm going to assume by online you're more interested in websites than mobile apps and I think there's a lack of a really good one-stop resource, however a lot of supermarkets do have vegan lists to be found; Sainsbury's are good in this respect. Luckily one site does a lot of that research for us and that site is Vegan Womble. For beer, wine and spirits ...


5

Here is a list of foods ranked by grams protein per British pound, which may vary in the US, but not likely by that much (note its a bit of a random selection). The third column is protein per unit of money, and the second column is percent of calories that are from protein. For example, peanut butter is very cost effective for obtaining protein but it also ...


5

The term nooch as a nickname for nutritional yeast seems to have originated at the Post Punk Kitchen forum way back. I say seems because I was not able to find any absolutely trustworthy source for this, but I did find a couple of weak ones (Urban Dictionary entry for nooch; this site and also this Post Punk Kitchen forum post that wonders about people ...


4

I am fairly certain this is merely a labelling oversight. I would consider it vegan and buy it (in fact I do buy the bar I think you are describing from time to time). Many UK retailers do not bother to label their products as vegan simply because of a general lack of awareness about veganism until recent years. Major ones seem to be catching on little by ...


4

I can't name every bread of course but yes, the Tesco bakery usually has a book, you can ask them about allergens etc because there's rarely labels on the fresh bread, as you've probably noticed. I asked about the Irish wheaten loaf in Tesco about a year ago and it was vegan in terms of ingredients but they warned me there was a chance of contamination. ...


3

As you said, the original society still exists as The Vegan Society, and they were formed by strict vegetarians that went on to exclude all animal products. According to their origin story the group etched out a definition of veganism. Vegan outreach by the society allowed them to absorb vegan movements from other locations. Vegans aren't all bound by the ...


2

Yes there are vegetarian versions available, but what you have to bear in mind is that there is a European scheme which protects the origin and quality of traditionally made foodstuffs such that it is illegal to make cheese and label it as "Parmesan" unless it is made in a specific region and with a specific method/recipe. In Europe, anything called "...


2

Marks and Spencer seem to have a few options, I found a list here of their vegan foods (confectionery starts on page 4), this link is dated 10th Feb 2017, but includes an email contact to get an up-to-date list. I've only tried the Mocktail Jellies, which are quite a bit softer than a Haribo type sweet, but some of the other sweets on the list seem like ...


2

I don't know if the German brand Haribo is available in the UK, they (and probably others) make a kind of vegan gummy. While they sell dozens of different shapes, this kind is called "gummi pasta" and doesn't use gelatin. You might find that other similar "hard gummies" are vegan.


2

This is not quite a database of all vegan products in the UK, but it does a good job with finding what will probably be easily accessible. You can filter by dietary requirements and by supermarket to find what is available at each store, and they list all ingredients in the individual product page. https://www.mysupermarket.co.uk/ Hope this helps.


2

It may also be a financial choice. In many countries, brands have to pay to be labeled as organic, vegetarian or vegan (at least to be labeled with official, internationally recognized labels). The farmer markets of my country are populated with booths of local producers who offer organic, local food, yet they aren't labeled "agriculture biologique" (i.e. ...


1

Myvegansupermarket is another good website to use as well as vegan womble. Also you can now get a pdf of the vegan foods at your chosen supermarket. If you type in the supermarket name and vegan list, there will be a pdf you can download eg. Tesco Vegan list.


1

Vegan substitute. (No one will mistake this for parmesan cheese, but it's great on pasta/pizza where you would normally use a grated parmesan.) In a food processor mix bread crumbs and walnuts with some fresh garlic, olive oil, and nutritional yeast. Salt to taste. Keeps in fridge for quite a while. This gives a nice savory crumb/powder that you can ...


1

Jelly tots are vegan. Here is an official source, it's a list of vegan products by Nestlé.


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