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The term vegan was intended by those who coined it to encompass lifestyles that respect non-human animals and refrain from any exploitation of them. From The Vegan Society history page Although the vegan diet was defined early on it was as late as 1949 before Leslie J Cross pointed out that the society lacked a definition of veganism and he suggested ...


11

Okinawa Japanese is one of the populations with the longest life span. Their average life span is 77 for men and 86 for women. They eat to 80% fullness and rely very heavily on whole unrefined plants. 70% of their total calories comes from sweet potatoes. They eat essentially no meat, eggs, dairy, no sugar, no oil, but they do have very small amounts of fish....


7

The 2013-study "Redefining agricultural yields: from tonnes to people nourished per hectare" by Cassidy et al. from the University of Minnesota investigates this question. The authors state that given the current mix of crop uses, growing food exclusively for direct human consumption could, in principle, increase available food calories by as much as 70%,...


6

I wouldn't be very surprised if it was. In the history of mankind, the ability to sustain something as big as a culture by purely plant-based means would not be the easiest way of doing things and unless there exist strong outside pressures (such as ethical ones that can be seen nowadays) then plant-based diet would be overshadowed by more diversified ...


5

Some Neanderthals in Spain have been found to have consumed zero animal products. The theory is that since they lived inside forests there was plently of roots, mushrooms, nuts and fruits thus no reason to chase giant animals. "Neanderthals from El Sidrón showed no evidence of meat eating – instead they appear to have survived on a mixture of forest ...


5

I did a report on vegetarianism in college, and back then-- when I had access to a university library-- I found that we would increase our global food supply by at least 40%, enough to sustain another 3 billion people. I can't find my source now, and most "What would happen if everyone went vegetarian?" articles focus mainly on climate change and the economy,...


3

This Wikipedia article is worth reading Complete protein. In particular, this quote: "In fact, the highest PDCAAS scores are not given to commonly eaten meat products, but rather to animal-derived vegetarian foods like milk and eggs and the vegan food soy protein isolate." So, there is one answer for you: Soy protein isolate. Another point is that many ...


2

Yes According to this abstract, the answer seems to be Yes (vegans are less susceptible to infectious diseases): Vegetarians have low rates of viral diseases. Vegetarians have less HPV (Human Papilloma Virus). This article mentions that vegetarians may have a lower risk of urinary tract infections. This article emphasizes the fact that a vegetarian diet ...


2

It is definitely not true "that a plant-based diet never sustained any traditional culture." St. Jerome gives numerous examples of cultures in antiquity who abstained from eating flesh in Against Jovinianus bk. 2: Dicæarchus in his book of Antiquities, describing Greece, relates that under Saturn, that is in the Golden Age, when the ground brought ...


2

This is an impossible question to answer, as no plant contains everything that you need. Here's a few remarkable ones though. Sweet Potato - High on a very large spectrum of nutriments. Avocado - One of the best plant-based sources of fats. Spinach - Extremely high in iron, folate, and vitamin K. Kale - Similar yet alternate stats to spinach, most ...


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Sweet potatoes. They are so nutritious that it makes up between 70 to 90 percent of the total calorie intake of longest living populations around the world like Okinawa Japanese, Papua New Guinea Seaside islanders, and Papua New Guinea Highlanders. And it's one of the official foods that NASA provides for its astronauts.


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There are many different important qualities found in foods, and no food provides all of them. So it's impossible to say that there is any single "best" food, and that's why it is essential to eat a variety of foods. If you wanted to know which plants are best at providing a specific nutrient, that would be an answerable question. Similarly, there is no ...


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First off: bravo for choosing to go vegan. This choice is absolutely great for animals and the environment! There is a big difference between being vegan and being plant-pased, which I will try to simplify. Basically, being vegan doesn't necessarily mean that you're eating plant-based, and eating plant-based doesn't necessarily mean that you're vegan. ...


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