24

In Europe and the Americas people who consider themselves vegetarians in general only avoid foods that are the direct result of an animal's death, such as meat. This does not technically apply to eggs, which are produced by hens who are not killed and in theory may be unharmed in the process. Ovulation happens in healthy adult animals without interference. ...


17

Yes. This article from 2005 summarises the scientific knowledge on birds feeling pain. It's worth taking a moment to define pain, as there is often confusion about this. The definition of pain from the International Association for the Study of Pain is: An unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or ...


16

The 'intelligent' behaviour that plants exhibit is not evidence for the capacity to suffer. Very simple organisms can show some kind of intelligence in their behaviour, and some think plants might even be conscious, but suffering is an entirely different matter. From an interview with a scientist: So, if I follow you, plants really do feel, not ...


13

Not all vegetarians do eat eggs. It's common that western vegetarians eat eggs but asian vegetarians do not. Airlines cater for this with their meals, offering both western (VGML) and asian (AVML) vegetarian meals. So whether eggs are or aren't vegetarian is cultural rather than universal and if you lived in India for instance you might well be of the ...


8

This is the kind of tiring hypothetical omnivores throw at vegans just to troll us, but I find it is usually better to answer them seriously, so: Why it's probably better not to eat the pig If I do not eat the pig, it may be eaten by other humans who would normally buy farmed meat, thus reducing demand for such meat. If not, it may be eaten by other animals (...


8

Plants don't have feelings as we know them So a scientist infests one plant with a bug, and finds out that another, non-infested plant has "communicated" with the first plant and starts bracing itself? And other plants can even learn? Therefore plants talk and think, therefore they are sentient? Should we stop eating them? Well, watch this. When I send you ...


7

One of the philosophies vegans use is that it's wrong to use animals. This relates to other ethical philosophies that advocate treating people as ends in themselves and not as means to our own ends. According to this philosophy, animals exist for their own purposes and confining them to benefit from them in any way is abusive, just as confining humans in ...


6

I'm not sure what you mean by "promote", but one can argue that utilitarianism is an ideology that justifies veganism/vegetarianism. For example, it is well established that being vegetarian reduces your footprint on arable land relative to an average Western diet (e.g., by reducing the demand for animal feed). Since this indirectly slows the tearing down ...


5

It is important to consider the context of this quote from Dr. Van Aken. It was presented in a university press release, and press releases tend to use language that is non-scientific or even sensationalist. The actual scientific study being featured was Mitochondrial and Chloroplast Stress Responses Are Modulated in Distinct Touch and Chemical Inhibition ...


5

For veganism, I can think of three possible issues with smoking cigarettes: The cigarettes might contain animal-derived ingredients. The cigarette manufacturer might test the cigarettes on animals. Smoking the cigarettes might harm nearby animals (e.g., pets) and humans. So, assuming such cigarettes exist (no animal testing, no animal ingredients), it ...


5

It's highly unlikely, due to them not having any brain or central nervous system. All they have is a small nerve network and two ganglia near their esophagus. The whole nervous system is basically two nerve centers, one that controls the muscles and the other one that controls the "foot" and other sensory organs. It's unknown whether the cerebral ganglia ...


4

Yes, there are some anarchist movements with deep links with veganism and animal liberation. The term veganarchism was popularized in 1995 thanks to the pamphlet Animal Liberation and Social Revolution of Brian A. Dominick which I think explains much better than I could the relation between the anarchist and vegan movements. It is also very possible to ...


4

Technically, no (source): Veganism [..] the practice of abstaining from the use of animal products, particularly in diet Using artificial leather can be a good replacement to obey vegan philosophy. no money goes directly to the animal-exploiting industries? This is highly debatable, but buying a second-hand object usually helps the seller getting a ...


4

"Noone should be vegetarian" I think this thesis is hardly defendable. There are no obvious downsides about veganism and vegetarianism for society, animals, or the environment. Fake arguments often brought up include: "You're eating soy, thus destroying rain forests." - Yes, I'm eating soy, no I'm not destroying rain forests with my consumption (not at all,...


4

How does the Vegan Society define "practicable"? (You know, from the definition: "Veganism is a way of living which seeks to exclude, as far as is possible and practicable, all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose.") Hello Adam, Thank you for getting in touch. Our meaning of ...


4

@Zanna makes some good points and considers that: "It may be the case that the kept hens have been rescued and would not be safe in the wild, and in such a scenario there might seem to be no ethical objection to eating the eggs." However, in the vast majority of "backyard hen" situations, the hens are not "rescued," but rather are purchased. The ...


2

What you describe as a lose-lose scenario is what's commonly described as a confirmation bias for a given belief (e.g. vegetarians are brainwashed). You can't work against that with conventional rhetoric, even if you win on the logical grounds, there is a big difference between proving something and convincing someone. As for convincing someone, being from ...


2

You could question them. "What am I brain washed about?" Probe into the specifics. The devil's in the details ;) You could draw comparisons to other movements, either historically or contemporary. For the 'smearing tactics', continue to ask what they are talking about: For instance, "What vegan parents let their children die?" (The one ...


2

As @Scimonster mentioned in the comment, this has to do with the ambiguous definition of the word 'vegetarian'. Depending on who you ask it can either mean 'does not eat meat or fish' (as in ovo-lacto-vegetarian) or 'does not eat animal products' (as in vegan). Both are valid definitions, so calling eggs vegetarian is not wrong. To back this up, here are ...


2

There is a dispute about whether chronesthesia, the mental ability to be aware of one's past or future also known as mental time travel, is limited to humans or whether it can also be found among non-human animals. So far, there is no scientifical consensus on this question. While some studies indicate that certain animals have chronesthesia (for instance ...


1

In short, Yes. But there is lot more to it than just that. To weaken your argument, nervous systems of plants are far inferior to animmals. As many have pointed out, this severely affects the way plants feel or suffer, as compared to animals (See this https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plant_perception_(physiology)) To generalise your argument, all physical ...


1

This also belong to philosophy, so we will have ask for their help to get answer to this question. This article deals with human life value, but also covers animals value: What is it about human life that makes it valuable? I can think of two plausible candidates: (a) consciousness, and (b) a holistic relation of our bodies and consciousness. Do ...


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