24

In Europe and the Americas people who consider themselves vegetarians in general only avoid foods that are the direct result of an animal's death, such as meat. This does not technically apply to eggs, which are produced by hens who are not killed and in theory may be unharmed in the process. Ovulation happens in healthy adult animals without interference. ...


20

Airlines provide a wide range of meals for people with different dietary restrictions. They have a common set of meal codes that they use so if you've wondered what the strange 4 letter code is on your ticket, it's one of these if it's vegetarian (there are other codes for non-vegetarian meals such as low-sodium that I won't list here but you can click on ...


17

All traditional cheese is non-vegetarian, but some kinds can be made vegetarian. Rennet is a combination of a bunch of enzymes, made in the stomach of ruminants such as cows. It's used in cheese-making to help separate the curds from the whey. It's most often sourced from slaughtering juvenile cows. However, rennet can also be sourced from GMO micro-...


13

Not all vegetarians do eat eggs. It's common that western vegetarians eat eggs but asian vegetarians do not. Airlines cater for this with their meals, offering both western (VGML) and asian (AVML) vegetarian meals. So whether eggs are or aren't vegetarian is cultural rather than universal and if you lived in India for instance you might well be of the ...


9

The standard non-vegetarian ingredient in cheese is animal-derived rennet. Non-animal rennet may be used to produce a vegetarian cheese. Sadly it's not yet mandatory in all countries to declare what type of rennet is used in a product. Some shops may be able to help with lists of products, and some manufacturers do label their cheeses accordingly A example ...


8

1. General vegetarians (Non-vegans) For non-vegans, dairy products seems to be the best source, as mentioned in other answers as well. List of top 4 (I'm excluding eggs): 1: Cheese The amount of vitamin B12 in cheese depends on type and variety, Swiss cheese provides the most with 3.34μg per 100g serving (56% DV), followed by Gjetost(40% DV), Mozzarella(39% ...


8

The essential part of the starter is a bacteria culture (some kind of lactobacillus). Yogurt is always made with a bacterial culture. Bacteria can be eaten by vegetarians and vegans: they are not animals. They are among the simplest life forms, lacking even a cell nucleus (they are prokaryotes). They are far less complex than plants. Countless numbers of ...


8

Although you mention Google translating закваска as yeast, I believe it means probiotic cultures instead. Now, I do not speak or read Bulgarian but I am good with finding patterns and the pattern I found in this word is something that would be translated to speech as 'zakvaska'. If that is how the word is read then I believe it means probiotic cultures. ...


6

This doesn't exactly answer "are there airlines that don't serve vegetarian meals", however you are likely to find more vegetarian options on Asian airlines. Given the number of Hindus and Buddhists that travel, it is essential. Failing that, take your own cheese sandwiches :o) Check out this answer for more info on religions that require vegetarianism.


6

I find the best substitute to for eggs is aquafaba (the liquid in a can of chickpeas). You can also make it yourself if you cook chickpeas at home, just reduce the water you cooked them in until it's slimy like egg whites. 3 tbsp of aquafaba = 1 egg. I use it as a substitute for eggs everywhere. Baking, mayo, pancakes, etc.


5

In the UK, cheeses made with non-animal rennet (the majority, as you say) are typically labelled in a user-friendly way, including the text: Suitable for vegetarians and in the ingredients we can find the phrase non-animal rennet The use of non-vegetarian rennet is usually denoted, in my experience of asking makers and manufacturers, by the absence ...


5

Animal products in general are really good sources of B12. This applies to milk and the products that are made from it and I would argue that eggs are a good source of it too, although your definition might be different. This RDI for B12 was previously set to be 6µg but is now being changed to 2.4µg. Based on this, following can be said: Milk is a very ...


4

From what I read regarding yoghurt production, the main (starter) cultures in yogurt are Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. The starter cultures are used to convert milk to yogurt during fermentation. As others have mentioned, these are friendly bacteria and not an animal derivative. If you are a strict vegetarian like me, then what we ...


4

TL;DR: use one tablespoon of flaxseed meal per egg as a drop in substitute for eggs in baking. To avoid clumping, soak the flaxseed meal in an equal volume of water first or add the flaxseed meal to the recipe last. Eggs serve a few main purposes in baking, they: provide structure provide some leavening provide water, macronutrients, and flavor function as ...


4

Just got a call from a very nice woman at Northstar pharmaceuticals who informed me that both Deblitane and Sharobel contain "no animal derived ingredients, including shellfish". While she could not guarantee cross contamination did not occur, I'd say that's good enough for me. Incassia was also confirmed to be vegetarian; its magnesium stearate is from ...


3

You totally can be a vegetarian and a body builder. I am a body builder for 35 years and a vegetarian for about 7 or 8 years. I feel much better meatless and my workouts have never suffered. There are good sources of plant based protein meals out there, like potatoes and corn or rice and black beans. In combination these meals have a complete amino acid ...


2

If you want to make a simpler recipe, 330 ml of a carbonate drink will replace oil, eggs, and milk. Or you can use chia, flax, or cornflour as egg substitutes. It is 1 tablespoon of chia, flax, or cornflour mixed with 3 tablespoons of water. Flax and chia seed "eggs" need at least 10 minutes soaking in the water before they are ready to use.


2

The US does not require manufacturers to label such things. So, unless the product specifically states it is vegan or vegetarian, I would presume it contains or uses rennet or other enzymes for all we know. A simple google search yields a few sites with "safe" lists - What are the Vegetarian Cheese lists? and Are there any Cheeses that do not contain Rennet ...


2

Where I worked they used grated part-skim milk mozzarella. Obviously I can't remember the ingridients of the supplier but pricey mozarella's don't have enzymes whereas cheap mozzarella has enzymes. I have never been to Malaysia (using logic - they should use the same business tactics as part of their brand), but with my experience from working in Dominos I ...


2

As @Scimonster mentioned in the comment, this has to do with the ambiguous definition of the word 'vegetarian'. Depending on who you ask it can either mean 'does not eat meat or fish' (as in ovo-lacto-vegetarian) or 'does not eat animal products' (as in vegan). Both are valid definitions, so calling eggs vegetarian is not wrong. To back this up, here are ...


1

I agree with what everyone is saying above. If you have not heard of Kendrick Farris or his story as a vegan lifter, you should check it out. He puts to rest a lot of stereotypes and misconceptions about veganism. In addition, he let's you in on his diet and how he builds muscles with plant protein. Here is the link to the article.


1

On long flights I always request the Hindu option (if possible). But I would highly recommend just bringing your own food if the Hindu is not available. The food is not great tasting, and is often junk. If you are coming from home, you can homemade sandwiches, wraps, sushi, and nuts(!), for example.


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