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In Europe and the Americas people who consider themselves vegetarians in general only avoid foods that are the direct result of an animal's death, such as meat. This does not technically apply to eggs, which are produced by hens who are not killed and in theory may be unharmed in the process. Ovulation happens in healthy adult animals without interference. ...


13

Not all vegetarians do eat eggs. It's common that western vegetarians eat eggs but asian vegetarians do not. Airlines cater for this with their meals, offering both western (VGML) and asian (AVML) vegetarian meals. So whether eggs are or aren't vegetarian is cultural rather than universal and if you lived in India for instance you might well be of the ...


10

There are probably not commercial farms that sell cruelty-free eggs as described by you, but it's likely that there are many individuals who keep a few chickens as pets and do not kill them after their egg production slows. For commercial farms, it's not commercially viable. Some back of the envelope math says farms would have to charge something like 4 ...


7

I think Reddit's r/vegan explains the issues with eating eggs from pet chickens well. To summarize: Acquiring pet chickens is problematic because hen breeders kill male chicks (~50% of the chicks they hatch), since they can only sell females. Hens have been bread to lay an unhealthy number of eggs per year. Wild chickens lay 12 eggs per year, while domestic ...


7

One of the philosophies vegans use is that it's wrong to use animals. This relates to other ethical philosophies that advocate treating people as ends in themselves and not as means to our own ends. According to this philosophy, animals exist for their own purposes and confining them to benefit from them in any way is abusive, just as confining humans in ...


7

Know if a egg is fertilized before opening it: If it comes from a industrial chicken farm, there are no cocks, so no chance a chicken get fertilized If it comes from a rural chicken farm, it is possible the egg is fertilized you should check if the egg comes from a little farm or not In italy in example you can take eggs directly from farmers, there is a ...


6

Buying organic free range eggs does nothing for protecting the cockerels. This is for example critisied here (in german) by PETA. There are organizations, which do raise the cockerels for meat (e.g. haehnlein). I was yet unable to find a souce for eggs, which don't include any animal killing.


6

In nature, poultry get their B12 by pecking for insects and worms in the dirt. Since this behaviour is not possible on industrial farms, B12 is added to animal feed1. According to the USDA, one cooked egg (50g) contains 0.56µg of vitamin B122. The recommended daily intake of B12 for people age 14 and older who aren't pregnant or breastfeeding is 2.4µg3, ...


4

@Zanna makes some good points and considers that: "It may be the case that the kept hens have been rescued and would not be safe in the wild, and in such a scenario there might seem to be no ethical objection to eating the eggs." However, in the vast majority of "backyard hen" situations, the hens are not "rescued," but rather are purchased. The ...


2

All for-profit egg producers kill chickens because it is not commercially viable to keep feeding chickens until old age. If laying hens were not slaughtered around two years of age (as is common) then they would live around four times longer, meaning the sale price of eggs would similarly increase fourfold. This is more than the market will bear, so ...


2

As @Scimonster mentioned in the comment, this has to do with the ambiguous definition of the word 'vegetarian'. Depending on who you ask it can either mean 'does not eat meat or fish' (as in ovo-lacto-vegetarian) or 'does not eat animal products' (as in vegan). Both are valid definitions, so calling eggs vegetarian is not wrong. To back this up, here are ...


1

With balut (fertilized duck eggs), popular in Southeast Asia, a bright light is held up to the egg to determine how far along the growth is. As a warning, if you’re at an Asian Market and see “duck eggs,” there’s a good chance they’re balut. (I learned that one the hard way.)


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