18

Chickens Egg-laying hens An estimated 95% of all eggs in the United States are produced in conventional cage systems, sometimes called battery cages. [They] typically provide each laying hen an average of 67 square inches of floor space. In some egg operations, hens have less space. Source: Table Egg Production and Hen Welfare: Agreement and Legislative ...


17

Yes. This article from 2005 summarises the scientific knowledge on birds feeling pain. It's worth taking a moment to define pain, as there is often confusion about this. The definition of pain from the International Association for the Study of Pain is: An unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or ...


11

Down is almost always collected from a live bird or from a bird killed for meat. There are 3 main ways: Live plucking, which you seem to already know about. The feathers are plucked from the live birds. This is done multiple times, until the bird is either slaughtered for meat or dies from the process of plucking. Post mortem collection, where the feathers ...


7

It would certainly be an amount greater than you spend on animal products, and even then, that money donated to whatever charity you choose doesn't cancel out the effect of your vote for the things those charities are opposed to. You have to realise that money isn't buying new ice caps or replacing animals, it's trying to affect change in society and ...


7

One of the philosophies vegans use is that it's wrong to use animals. This relates to other ethical philosophies that advocate treating people as ends in themselves and not as means to our own ends. According to this philosophy, animals exist for their own purposes and confining them to benefit from them in any way is abusive, just as confining humans in ...


6

There are no live animal tracking systems like what you describe. I tried looking for live video streams from farms and I was able to find one video feed from a farm sanctuary in NY but of course they don't sell animal products there. What about abattoirs/slaughterhouses? Although there are plans in the UK to outfit slaughterhouses with compulsory CCTV ...


6

I am pretty sure there has never been governmental (or feudal/whatever) ban on animal slaughter and/or consumption, so I do not see your original question being answered. There can, however, be some approximation by looking at other huge organisations (such as religions) which do at times promote such bans. There is also the possibility of answering based on ...


6

Getting the exact figures requires a lot of effort, so I am going to concentrate in getting the order of magnitude. Also, another factor that makes the effort grow considerably is the various types of meat that are being eaten: beef, pork, broilers, other Chicken, turkey, fish etc. So, let's consider the beef. This article provides little insight about beef ...


5

It's highly unlikely, due to them not having any brain or central nervous system. All they have is a small nerve network and two ganglia near their esophagus. The whole nervous system is basically two nerve centers, one that controls the muscles and the other one that controls the "foot" and other sensory organs. It's unknown whether the cerebral ganglia ...


5

The question has a strong normative undertone. I believe the community agrees that foie gras production is cruel and should be outlawed, so I will not comment on the normative aspect of the question, i.e. whether local customs should count as reasonable exemptions from bans on animal cruelty. Instead I focus on the question why there is in fact such an ...


5

In the most ethical dairy farm I could imagine while still having real cows and real farmers, but maybe not real economics, the dairy cows are harmed by having to give milk much longer than their calves need. They're milked four times a day. One might expect that they'd need to be herded into the barn each of those times, so that they can be milked, but the ...


5

There's really not any information on the subject. This is on of the only article in English I've found which seems to contain factual information. And there is this testimony of someone who went on a truffle farm. From other articles I've read (mainly in French), here's what I gathered : Although there are some breeds more suitable for this, and it is ...


4

@Zanna makes some good points and considers that: "It may be the case that the kept hens have been rescued and would not be safe in the wild, and in such a scenario there might seem to be no ethical objection to eating the eggs." However, in the vast majority of "backyard hen" situations, the hens are not "rescued," but rather are purchased. The ...


4

So far as I know there is no federal legislation protecting farm animals on the farm (in the U.S.A.), with some legislation (but perhaps insufficient enforcement) protecting them at the slaughter house. For details of the legislation see my answer to the question "Is gratuitous farm animal abuse condoned by the USDA?" on Skeptics.SE. You might be looking ...


3

I would say that, if we stopped keeping farm animals, the numbers of those animals would be reduced to effectively zero. This doesn't include farmed animals kept as pets (rabbits or guinea pigs) or feral animals whose ancestors were farm animals (feral horses or feral pigs); those would likely stay around current levels. Why? The land used to support ...


3

I think the most affected species are/were those that are either (completely) extinct or on. brink of extinction. A list of these species is found on this Wikipedia page (unfortunately the page is not homogeneously constructed as it mixes extinct species with almost extinct and other articles dealing with similar subjects). I will try to also include ...


3

The animal welfare portion of this question already has a complex answer, before even beginning to consider the complexities of climate change and carbon offsets. Therefore in my answer I will focus on animal welfare and ignore the climate change component of the question. This question implicitly assumes that vegans make up a relatively small portion of ...


3

Surely from a vegetarian's point of view, it is the one big fish. You are killing one being rather than one-hundred. However, if the species of large fish is endangered, then the question is 'Is somebody who is non-vegetarian willing to risk $50000 (the fine for killing an endangered animal) for animal welfare?' Which, even for vegetarians, is difficult. In ...


3

If you only look at the body count: to have milk, there must be a calf. That animal won't get the food it needs (since we are taking the milk) and is slaughtered if it's a male (a female baby cow will become a dairy cow). The veal industry benefits greatly from the dairy industry. So even if your only requirement is no animal death, dairy products aren't ...


3

Death, especially the way they are all handled, requires pain and suffering. An individual's death experience is not something you can replicate. Their pain, suffering, and death is just as traumatic to one as it is to the other. Here's how you reduce the pain and suffering: Stop eating them. Simple as that.


2

Just a review, from here: Federal law in the United States requires that animals should be stunned before they are slaughtered. The following types of stunning are used: captive bolt stunning and electrical stunning. However, this law is often broken at these slaughterhouses. This indicates that the law is broken often, probably due to speed-slaughter ...


2

Humans are the only creatures who drink milk even after the very first years of their life, and they don’t use their own milk to drink; in the dairy industry they force cows to become pregnant all the time so they can get the milk they want, because animals can only lactate after pregnancy. And if you think they let the cows get pregnant by having sex, you ...


2

Short answer Yes, Alice reduces animal suffering by buying animal products bearing this logo Long answer Wikipedia mentions briefly animal welfare as a topic covered by regulation: This agreement covers such issues as foodstuffs, disease prevention and veterinary treatments, animal welfare, husbandry practices and the management of manure. The regulation ...


2

Ahimsa Milk in the UK operated between 2014 and 2017 and during that time they collected and sold cow's milk according to their Ahimsa Manifesto. However they seem to have suspended their operations for the time being. Calves are kept with mothers and elder cows are retired into a non-slaughter herd when their productive days are over. The retail price ...


2

The most affected species are fish and other sea creatures. Because, per year, according to Wikipedia, 8.8 million metric tons of waste, including e-waste, are thrown into the sea. Radiation from the e-waste, chemical components and everything are making the life of ocean creatures difficult. They may either die, or get some disease and die slowly. This also ...


2

Eiderdown is collected from the eider nests. Eiders are a duck that live on northern European and American coasts. They line their nests with the soft feathers from the duck's breast. The original nest material is replaced with straw so the duck can continue to incubate the eggs, or the nest is collected after the ducklings have hatched. Eiderdown ...


2

For products bearing the European Union organic label under regulation 834/2007, the answer is yes. Whether or not the regulation is strict enough may be evaluated differently, but clearly it is a huge progress compared to standard farm factory practice. Article 3 defines the objectives and principles of organic agriculture. Accordingly, organic agriculture ...


2

The main goal of organic labels is to prevent the usage of GMO or chemicals. I would add that it could depend on the country where you buy the food. In short, there are standards but they are very low and not much different from the most basic legal standards for the treatment of animals in agriculture. In France, the organic label requires that the ...


2

My biggest advice to you is one that you might not immediately like, but please, give it a thought: Don't look for a job yet. Go on with your education. Go to university. Learn about agriculture, or about ethics, about the climate, or just about anything you're interested in! If you think you need to work in order to study, apply for scholarships first. ...


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