18

In biology, organisms are grouped into a set of categories called, for some reason, kingdoms. These are, of course, somewhat artificial, but the need of biologists to categorise is shared by vegetarians and vegans; so much so that we can use the biology concept of kingdoms to say what it is we eat and do not eat. In general, vegetarians do not eat animals. ...


17

All traditional cheese is non-vegetarian, but some kinds can be made vegetarian. Rennet is a combination of a bunch of enzymes, made in the stomach of ruminants such as cows. It's used in cheese-making to help separate the curds from the whey. It's most often sourced from slaughtering juvenile cows. However, rennet can also be sourced from GMO micro-...


16

From the searchable "is your booze vegan" directory Barnivore website: It might seem weird at first, but your favourite drink might have more than just alcohol in it. Brewmasters, winemakers, and distillers may include animal ingredients in their products directly, or they might use them in the processing and filtration. When making the ...


14

The other rationale for eating something like gelatin, e.g. Amonium phosphatides, Magnesium Stearate, Carmine, Lipase, is that animal derived additives are everywhere. They often occur in small amounts in processed foods. In the past, as a practical matter, I didn't worry about animal derived additives. At that time, I didn't have the shopping skills to ...


12

Mushrooms (or fungi) are not plants and are not animals either. Feel free to check out some "phylogenetic tree" diagrams to understand more clearly how they differ. The eatable mushroom is a bit like a "fruit", a fruiting body, meaning it's kind of made to be vulnerable and eventually eaten. The function of the mushroom is to release spores. When you take a ...


11

I think the main reason one eating gelatin is not knowing how it is made (extra source) or, more probable, that many products than seem vegetarian, actually contain it. This is summed up here: Gelatin is not vegetarian and is certainly not vegan. Sadly, millions of vegetarians and vegans could actually be using animal commodities unknowingly as the ...


11

It is hard to find any hard sources for this online and I would very much like to see an answer from a person from the field (or someone with similar knowledge and expertise), but since there is, I suppose, quite a small chance that such person would visit this site and answer this question, I will try to answer nonetheless. The biggest problem with ...


10

I've never heard of mushrooms being considered non-vegan. That having been said, there are some people who are allergic to fungus spores and/or fungus protein. There are also people who are really disturbed by fungus texture or resilience. And, as all foods, there are some people who are just put off by the thought of them. There are probably some other ...


9

The essential part of the starter is a bacteria culture (some kind of lactobacillus). Yogurt is always made with a bacterial culture. Bacteria can be eaten by vegetarians and vegans: they are not animals. They are among the simplest life forms, lacking even a cell nucleus (they are prokaryotes). They are far less complex than plants. Countless numbers of ...


9

Although you mention Google translating закваска as yeast, I believe it means probiotic cultures instead. Now, I do not speak or read Bulgarian but I am good with finding patterns and the pattern I found in this word is something that would be translated to speech as 'zakvaska'. If that is how the word is read then I believe it means probiotic cultures. ...


9

The standard non-vegetarian ingredient in cheese is animal-derived rennet. Non-animal rennet may be used to produce a vegetarian cheese. Sadly it's not yet mandatory in all countries to declare what type of rennet is used in a product. Some shops may be able to help with lists of products, and some manufacturers do label their cheeses accordingly A example ...


7

It depends on whether you consider insects animals or not. If you are a vegan/vegetarian and you don't want to eat anything in the biological kingdom Animalia, you can't eat insects. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda (unranked): Ectognatha Class: Insecta (from Wikipedia) Many people have the attitude "if something has to die for me to eat it,...


7

I would say it's a matter of opinion whether it's OK for you to use the product, although from a strictly vegan perspective it might be considered probably not OK. But if the exact status of the coral in the product matters, then you will need to ask the manufacturer for clarity. To elaborate, as Erica pointed out, both of your sources are correct; "coral" ...


7

A few days ago I read this question on the Biology Stack Exchange Does cheese contain cells of animal stomachs? It reminds us how rennet is made: Dried and cleaned stomachs of young calves are sliced into small pieces and then put into salt water or whey, together with some vinegar or wine to lower the pH of the solution. After some time (overnight or ...


6

Zanna's answer is very good but I would like to add a little. There are no laws about what you may and may not eat to be allowed to call yourself vegetarian or vegan. You are free to pick your own definition and there are many variations. When I was first vegetarian many years ago, some people took it to mean just "don't eat meat" and expected that I ...


6

I worked as a marine conservation educator for 15 years. Here's what I can contribute to this discussion. Unless you know for certain that coral rock was collected sustainably, ie, already dead and collected on shore, don't buy, use or exploit any product containing coral. Living coral is under tremendous environmental pressures caused by human activity, ...


6

SodaStream syrups are all vegetarian given that their primary ingredients are sweeteners. No meat or fish products are used in common commercialized syrups. SodaStream has confirmed that its Fruit Drops are 100% vegan, while most of their other syrups are "vegan-friendly." If you are still unsure about the ingredients of a SodaStream syrup, consider trying ...


5

From what I read regarding yoghurt production, the main (starter) cultures in yogurt are Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. The starter cultures are used to convert milk to yogurt during fermentation. As others have mentioned, these are friendly bacteria and not an animal derivative. If you are a strict vegetarian like me, then what we ...


5

Another possible reason some vegetarians/vegans might avoid mushrooms is because of mushroom farming practices. Mushroom soil is generally a manure-rich soil used for growing mushrooms, and one could argue that mushrooms use animal byproducts in their growth, but in reality, if we based all decisions on that ground, there'd be very little for anyone to eat ...


5

Just got a call from a very nice woman at Northstar pharmaceuticals who informed me that both Deblitane and Sharobel contain "no animal derived ingredients, including shellfish". While she could not guarantee cross contamination did not occur, I'd say that's good enough for me. Incassia was also confirmed to be vegetarian; its magnesium stearate is from ...


3

There is no official body dictating what vegetarians may and may not eat. Each needs to make his or her own decision. I don't think that I would eat it since I am quite happy with traditional vegetarian options. However, if meat eaters switch to it then I would be pleased.


3

Cosmetics are very complex products (lots of different substances) and it is quite hard to really understand if one product is 100% vegan or not. This article touches the surface of some non-vegan substances that are used for cosmetics: Lanolin as emollient Shellac in nail or hair products Glycerine is used for a broad range of products that include soaps, ...


3

I personally think most instant noodles are not very nutritious and full of flavour enhancers etc god knows what else. Here is an alternative approach that I take, and it will allow you more control of what is in your food. So instead of instant noodles, I will buy various plain noodles like this, or Asian vermicelli or this very high protein bean noodles, ...


3

Sri Lanka Kottu Mee Hot and Spicy Instant Noodles are my favorite. I usually bring back about fifty packages when I return to Canada I also love the Cheese and Onion flavor which I find just as spicy. They cost about fifty cents a package. The package of the cheese flavor states 'May contain traces of Milk Products', but at least there are no chunks of ...


3

I have little trouble finding vegetarian ones in the UK. As an example I have to hand, the "curry flavour" Maggi* ones list no animal-derived ingredients. Milk is listed as an allergen that may be contained, rather than as an ingredient. Unfortunately the rather tasty Indo-Mie vegetable flavour (with chilli and lime) ones are suspect. They ...


2

Concerning the usage of the words vegetarian and vegan, by definition gelatin is not any of the two, so the question is moot. On the other hand when it comes to an ethical framework based on morals frequently taken as the reason for veg*anism, I can argue in favour of gelatin, to a degree. The argument applies to several reasons for living veg*n, for ...


2

I am a vegetarian, and I have no issue with consuming gelatin. My reason for being vegetarian is because meat doesn't taste pleasant to my palate.


2

The only honest answers are "it's up to you" and "for what purpose?" In short, you can call yourself whatever you want. If you're designing a survey to track lifestyle by diet, you might consider lumping in insect-eaters with vegetarians if you feel they have more in common there than they do with meat eaters. Call yourself a vegan if you want to draw ...


2

Where I worked they used grated part-skim milk mozzarella. Obviously I can't remember the ingridients of the supplier but pricey mozarella's don't have enzymes whereas cheap mozzarella has enzymes. I have never been to Malaysia (using logic - they should use the same business tactics as part of their brand), but with my experience from working in Dominos I ...


2

Mushroom is very nutritious. A vegetarian can eat it without any doubt, because it is not a thing which has taken birth from any animal or egg, it is grown like a plant. Just as plants are living things from where we get our vegetables and fruits, mushrooms are also grown as plants, although they require environments which are different from the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible