Hot answers tagged

31

Consent is one issue, Mothers have a choice, animals don't, we can't ask them whether they want to participate. Milk production involves female cows and to get them you need male cows. Male cows are either eaten or destroyed which many vegetarians and vegans find problematic.


24

Vegans do not have a problem with 'a mother cow breastfeeding their babies'. Vegans have a problem with humans consuming a cow's breastmilk. It is natural for a woman to breastfeed a child. It is not natural, biologically speaking, for a human to drink another animal's breast milk. It is also a matter of consent. There is a lot of death and cruelty involved ...


16

The 'intelligent' behaviour that plants exhibit is not evidence for the capacity to suffer. Very simple organisms can show some kind of intelligence in their behaviour, and some think plants might even be conscious, but suffering is an entirely different matter. From an interview with a scientist: So, if I follow you, plants really do feel, not ...


10

There are probably not commercial farms that sell cruelty-free eggs as described by you, but it's likely that there are many individuals who keep a few chickens as pets and do not kill them after their egg production slows. For commercial farms, it's not commercially viable. Some back of the envelope math says farms would have to charge something like 4 ...


9

A lot of the questions asking about something being considered vegan can be answered by asking Considered by whom?. While there are some clear-cut rules that comprise the core vegan ideology, many lines that surround these are blurry to some extent and therefore susceptible to producing differing opinions on these borderline cases. If the question asks ...


8

Plants don't have feelings as we know them So a scientist infests one plant with a bug, and finds out that another, non-infested plant has "communicated" with the first plant and starts bracing itself? And other plants can even learn? Therefore plants talk and think, therefore they are sentient? Should we stop eating them? Well, watch this. When I send you ...


8

This is the kind of tiring hypothetical omnivores throw at vegans just to troll us, but I find it is usually better to answer them seriously, so: Why it's probably better not to eat the pig If I do not eat the pig, it may be eaten by other humans who would normally buy farmed meat, thus reducing demand for such meat. If not, it may be eaten by other animals (...


8

Ask yourself, in the end it is you who decides. Keeping the old non-vegan stuff but not getting any new; you find it ethical and sound to keep wearing your leather jacket because you are honoring the donor, so to speak. You would feel guilty to throw it away rather than keep using it till the end. Giving it away instead; you find it abhorring to keep using ...


8

The fact that such products may be labelled vegan and receive, for example, the UK Vegan Society (an ethics-based organisation) trademark indicates, in my opinion, that the consensus insofar as there can be one on the matter, is that the ethical implications are not significant. That is, as an ethical vegan, you should apparently not be troubled about it in ...


8

There are a lot of dimensions to this question, and you've done well to narrow it. I'm going to assume that you want to balance the pragmatic results of your actions with not increasing the overall demand for meat in the world. In this case, and for this set of facts, it's not unreasonable on the face of it to eat the meat- the pragmatic effect would not ...


7

In general vegans avoid all animal products. Beeswax, used in some cleaning products and cosmetics, is not permitted in products labelled vegan, for example by the UK Vegan Society (and, to the best of my knowledge, its sister organisations around the world). Of course, a person who considers themselves vegan may choose to compromise in some circumstances, ...


7

One of the philosophies vegans use is that it's wrong to use animals. This relates to other ethical philosophies that advocate treating people as ends in themselves and not as means to our own ends. According to this philosophy, animals exist for their own purposes and confining them to benefit from them in any way is abusive, just as confining humans in ...


7

It would certainly be an amount greater than you spend on animal products, and even then, that money donated to whatever charity you choose doesn't cancel out the effect of your vote for the things those charities are opposed to. You have to realise that money isn't buying new ice caps or replacing animals, it's trying to affect change in society and ...


7

There's a lot to talk about here and I'm sorry for this long answer so, here's a TL;DR: Given what we know about veganism, biology, entomology, philosophy and agriculture, we shouldn't aim at eating insects to save rodents because that's inefficient and kills tremendous numbers of living beings that are very likely to be sentient and to feel pain. Veganism ...


7

I think Reddit's r/vegan explains the issues with eating eggs from pet chickens well. To summarize: Acquiring pet chickens is problematic because hen breeders kill male chicks (~50% of the chicks they hatch), since they can only sell females. Hens have been bread to lay an unhealthy number of eggs per year. Wild chickens lay 12 eggs per year, while domestic ...


6

general consensus...hahahahahaha ;o) Steve I'm afraid there will be no consensus any time soon. While food produced with pesticides kills animals in the process, it usually doesn't contain animal parts (in contrast to organic food, which may contain the odd bug or two), and would be considered vegan. Vegan ethics & pesticide However, many vegans choose ...


6

Buying organic free range eggs does nothing for protecting the cockerels. This is for example critisied here (in german) by PETA. There are organizations, which do raise the cockerels for meat (e.g. haehnlein). I was yet unable to find a souce for eggs, which don't include any animal killing.


6

Another factor is disgust. When you are used to not eating animals, it becomes difficult to see animals as food, even if you did eat them at some previous time. I do not even walk in the "meat" aisle if I go to the supermarket, because it makes me feel sick. My parents became vegetarian 2.5 and 1.5 years ago, and they now feel the same total revulsion at ...


6

There are no live animal tracking systems like what you describe. I tried looking for live video streams from farms and I was able to find one video feed from a farm sanctuary in NY but of course they don't sell animal products there. What about abattoirs/slaughterhouses? Although there are plans in the UK to outfit slaughterhouses with compulsory CCTV ...


5

It's highly unlikely, due to them not having any brain or central nervous system. All they have is a small nerve network and two ganglia near their esophagus. The whole nervous system is basically two nerve centers, one that controls the muscles and the other one that controls the "foot" and other sensory organs. It's unknown whether the cerebral ganglia ...


5

Besides the information within the provided answers, there are also other forces in the big picture: Instinct, the breastfeeding instinct exists in virtually all babies and this a powerful reason for the mother. More details can be found in this article: Health benefits - there are many health benefits associated with breastfeeding, as indicated in this ...


5

The Wikipedia page you reference also lists more ethical alternatives: Breeding programs to reduce susceptibility Insecticides Topical protein-based treatments which kill wool follicles and tighten skin in the breech area Biological control of blowflies. Plastic clips on the sheep's skin folds which act like castration bands, removing the skin (breech ...


5

You have asked about animal cruelty, animal product or something else. I would argue that because of each one of these things: Animal cruelty: To satisfy the demand of our booming population, milk industry is far far away from where it was just a few centuries ago. Milk, primarily intended for calves, is being harvested by machines in an infinite loop to ...


5

Short answer : it depends on the "brand" of veganism you are talking about. Even the way the sheep has been saved can influence the view one can have on the subject. If the sheep that has been saved has been bought back before being killed, the saving in itself can be viewed as vegan (you saved an individual from death) or non-vegan (by paying them, you ...


5

I am an “ethical vegan”; consequently I don’t eat animals or animal products, the same way one wouldn’t eat a person who had committed suicide or died of natural causes. You wouldn’t leave them to be scavenged by others; you would perform whatever Death Rites are appropriate. Ultimately, it’s about respect for all life and each creature's inherent value.


5

For veganism, I can think of three possible issues with smoking cigarettes: The cigarettes might contain animal-derived ingredients. The cigarette manufacturer might test the cigarettes on animals. Smoking the cigarettes might harm nearby animals (e.g., pets) and humans. So, assuming such cigarettes exist (no animal testing, no animal ingredients), it ...


5

Short answer: avoid it, unless you can't. Safety/health matters more than trying to be perfect. Be compassionate. Longer answer: Disclaimer: I'm a beginner flexitarian, approaching veganism, the views are my own. My approach is: Avoid the situation (killing the beetle) if you can. Ex: put mosquito nets at your door at home If the situation could not be ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible