29

Apparently, the reason manufacturers label sugar as vegan is due to the way it's refined. If they use bone char (charred cow bones) to process sugar, then they won't label it as vegan. Processed Sugar It isn't a bleach bath that takes sugar from coarse and brown to fine and white. Most raw sugar is actually refined with a bone char. To make bone char,...


29

Source: Hidden Animal Ingredients in Foods (dummies.com), slightly modified and extended. Can be vegan, or animal based: Glucose (dextrose) - Animal tissues and fluids (some glucose can come from fruits) Glycerides (mono-, di-, and triglycerides) - Glycerol from animal fats or plants Lactic acid - An acid formed by bacteria acting on sugar, ...


27

Yeast is a unicellular organism, a type of fungus (not an animal). It is significantly less complex than any plant. It has no central nervous system. I eat it with a clear conscience.


25

It would be vegan if its production does not rely on the exploitation of animals. One part of the motivation for lab-grown meat, artificial milk, etc., is to reduce our systematic exploitation of animals, or at least in the marketing thereof. This company does claim that their lab-grown milk is vegan and “kind”. Lab-grown meats are still far from being on ...


20

I can't answer definitively but possibly my experience is worth sharing here. Thinking about food labelling, products may be labelled vegan and have a warning aimed at allergy sufferers along the lines of produced in a facility that handles dairy products, eggs [...] So, a product can be vegan if cross-contamination may have taken place. I am vegan for ...


18

Yes. Not all condoms are Vegan. There are different types of condoms available. While most condoms are made from rubber latex, condoms made from lamb cecums are also available. These are called lamb-skin condoms or just skin condoms in short. Quoting from this article. History: The term condom is actually a corruption of the name of an 18th-century ...


15

Just another perspective, maybe should have been a comment instead, but: I read once, on a blog possibly but it was a good few years ago, that the person no longer sees meat as food, and I agree totally. When people ask me questions like 'don't you miss x thing?', it almost doesn't compute because there's meat and then there's food, and I wouldn't use ...


14

In a similar vein to sugar, bone char is also used to filter water. This works in the same way normal charcoal filtering does, with the water passed through the bone char. In the US, this has been mostly phased out. (source) It's possible that your water is still filtered with bone char however, and there's no real way to be sure short of asking your city ...


13

Spirits, wine and beers are all plant-based, however beer and wine are sometimes processed using animal by-products (egg, gelatin, casein, glycerin, or isinglass) used as a fining agent for settling out suspended matter in the vat. Generally, British beers use isinglass, gelatin, glycerin or casein. German and Belgium beers using traditional methods of ...


12

In principle, it's non-vegan, but whether a vegan would hold its use ethical or not depends a bit on the situation (and possibly on the vegan). Uses of dung As far as I know there are two main uses for dung: Collecting, processing and using it as fertiliser ("Dünger" in German) Collecting, drying and burning it as fuel If you use the dung, you justify ...


12

Yes, plant foods pollinated by bees and other animals are suitable for vegans. After this subject was recently discussed on the BBC comedy television quiz show `QI' many news media producers started to raise alarm that almonds and avocados are not vegan because... Vegans eschew not only products made from animals, such as bacon and leather, but also ...


11

Yes, there are a lot of teas (ie mixed infusions sold in tea shops) that are non-vegan and you should check the label and if it's unclear, ask staff for assistance before you buy. I live in London. There is a nationwide chain of tea (and coffee) stores in the UK, Whittards, that sells a wide range of infusions. I have noticed that several of these products ...


11

By definition, vegans do not use any animal product, food or otherwise https://www.vegansociety.com/go-vegan/definition-veganism Veganism is a way of living which seeks to exclude, as far as is possible and practicable, all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose. Although I know many Vegans, I do ...


11

The Vegan Society UK currently defines veganism as a lifestyle which seeks to avoid exploitation of animals and further clarifies that this means the avoidance of animal products and byproducts. One thing all vegans have in common is a plant-based diet avoiding all animal foods such as meat (including fish, shellfish and insects), dairy, eggs and honey - ...


10

SS' answer is covering almost all the aspects of the question. Many condoms are indeed not vegan. As already mentioned, this is caused by casein usage in the manufacturing process. More information is provided by this article that deals with more technical details of how condoms are made: Many condoms companies manufacture their latex condoms using ...


10

To me, veganism is primarily an ethical position that aims to create a world where animals are used as little as possible. Based on this, if a company doesn't intend to use animal products in their product, aren't paying the animal agriculture industries, and aren't sending the message that animal products are required to make something tasty, I consider ...


10

Yes, Marmite is vegan. Yeast is a type of microfungi and as such is not considered non-vegan or an animal product, just like any other kind of mushroom. Regarding yeast and veganism, there are already some answers in this thread.


10

Methods that appear to be reliably vegan: Rhythm method (tracking menstrual cycle to avoid intercourse around ovulation) Withdrawal (avoiding ejaculation in/on the vagina) Sterilization (tubal ligation or vasectomy) A copper IUD (intrauterine device), although investigation into whether a particular company or IUD used animal testing would be advisable ...


9

TL;DR: if no animals are harmed and no animal products are used, then yes, it's considered vegan. A product of "purely mineral origin" will be considered vegan if no animals are exploited in the process of producing it, since, as vegans we avoid using animals and animal products for our own ends wherever possible. As far as I know, the synthesis of L-...


9

In addition to those listed above: Some flavour enhancers. While MSG and its derivatives are considered usually plant based, this is not the case with guanylic or inosinic acid compounds, which are often made from meat or fish extracts. Vitamin fortifications in drinks - fish-based carrier substances are often not listed since they are considered a part of ...


9

A lot of the questions asking about something being considered vegan can be answered by asking Considered by whom?. While there are some clear-cut rules that comprise the core vegan ideology, many lines that surround these are blurry to some extent and therefore susceptible to producing differing opinions on these borderline cases. If the question asks ...


9

There is no official definition of veganism so you won't get a definitive answer. You could eat consenting humans and call yourself a vegan if you wish. You might be breaking the law but not because you misrepresented yourself as vegan.


9

After death I would argue that human meat is vegan no matter if consent was given, as long as the human was not intentionally killed (and the meat is taken after death), and the human was free (i.e., not a slave). This applies to non-human animals, too: it would be vegan to take the meat of animals who died in the wild (without human influence) or of ...


9

It depends. The classic Oreo cookie is made using the same main ingredients, With some substitutions like in Canada, where the vegetable oil is coconut oil. None of these ingredients are currently of animal origin: Sugar Unbleached enriched flour (wheat flour, niacin, iron, thiamine mono-nitrate (vitamin B1), riboflavin (vitamin B2), folic acid) High oleic ...


8

Gerrit's answer is undoubtedly the correct and concise one, but this is such an interesting subject that I have to offer a couple of thoughts. While it might be vegan I think it's incompatible with the vegan ethos, in my opinion. I think it normalises the impression of meat as both food and commodity. There's every chance that this will be part of the ...


8

If you happen to live in a place that demands trace chemicals to be described in the label, look for known inorganic oxidants: Bromates or Iodates Peroxides (calcium, magnesium, etc) and/or azodicarbonamide (also azo[bis]formamide) http://seaystanford.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/Screen-Shot-2013-07-28-at-3.57.44-PM.png Chlorine [dioxide|oxide] (ClO2) ...


8

Assuming that veganism, roughly speaking, is a lifestyle that aims to not support animal exploitation, I would say that these products are vegan. The particles of milk that may end up on the products are not giving any funding to the dairy industry that produced them, unlike products whose ingredients directly contain dairy.


8

Marmite is vegan. However, if you are vegan because of the animal rights side of things, you should take into consideration that it is made by Unilever and they are heavily involved in animal testing. Most of the main supermarkets do a generic brand, all of which taste no different.


8

The fact that such products may be labelled vegan and receive, for example, the UK Vegan Society (an ethics-based organisation) trademark indicates, in my opinion, that the consensus insofar as there can be one on the matter, is that the ethical implications are not significant. That is, as an ethical vegan, you should apparently not be troubled about it in ...


8

No, that wine would not be considered vegan. The relevant question to ask yourself in general is not: Are there animal parts in this food? Instead, the question to ask is: Were animals used at any point in the process of creating this food?


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