19

When in doubt, consult your doctor, and do bloodwork! Iron. I have never had anemia problems and iron is replete in dark leafy greens. Vitamin A. Primarily found in meats, but also in cooked vegetables. If you are a raw vegan you are at risk for Vitamin A. Vitamin D. You are likely at risk anyway if you live in a northern climate. Vitamin D affects ...


17

Some scientific research suggests that possible deficiency of omega-3 is not a major concern for vegetarians or vegans. There are several kinds of Omega 3: ALA, EPA and DHA. The first can be found in plant products, such as linseed and chia seed, while the second and third belong primarily to animal products like fish, but can be sourced from algae. Hence ...


17

A distinction needs to be made between the different omega 3 fatty acids, namely ALA, EPA and DHA. All three of them are needed in a healthy human. Humans can metabolise ALA into EPA, and EPA into DHA, but the process is inefficient, can be inhibited by high Omega 6 fat intake, and requires a huge supply of ALA (or EPA, to produce DHA). (Other omega 3 acids ...


13

Nutrients of concern for Vegans There are a few nutrients that may be more difficult to obtain on a vegan diet as compared to an unrestricted (omnivorous) diet. b12 Vitamin B12 is easy, cheap, and safe to supplement. It is not reliably available from any plant-based foods. All vegans should take a vitamin B12 supplement. fats EPA and DHA are long-chain ...


7

Currently, there seem to be no natural plant food that would contain vitamin B12 in the amounts sufficient for humans. Some plant foods contain vitamin B12, but this is either inactive - pseudovitamin B12 - (in spirulina, chlorella, tempeh, miso, kombu) or not present in sufficient amounts (in white button mushrooms, Korean purple laver or nori or ...


6

Whilst the Vegan Society contains a more comprehensive list of the common deficiencies, I'm going to mention vitamin D. Vitamin D supports your immune system and is thought to contribute to a positive mental state, though personally I think going out in the sun could just as easily have that effect regardless of its nutritional worth. The reason it'...


6

Grains, nuts, algae, and flax are all potential sources of Omega 3 (source)


5

Omega3 is contained in vegetarian/vegan food, and in good quantities, in particular some of the top rich foods in Omega3 are good for a vegan diet. Edamame/Soy (but be careful, soy based foods increase chance of getting fat, and according to some experts increase breast cancer) Nuts, are surprisingly rich in Omega3 (9000 mg over 100g of nuts) Beans, maybe ...


4

From a quick web search: Ridges. Our nails naturally develop slight vertical ridges as we age. However, severe and raised ridges can be a sign of iron deficiency anemia. Nutritional deficiencies, such as a lack of vitamin A, vitamin B, vitamin B12 or keratin can result in fingernail ridges. Hormonal changes can also cause ridges to appear. Beau's lines. ...


3

It sounds like you have an iron deficiency [bleeding gums is a common symptom], not a vitamin C deficiency. You probably feel better when eating a lot of fruit because, to many people's surprise, many fruits have some iron. In addition, vitamin C found in fruit helps you absorb iron found in other plant based food. Here is some things you can do When you ...


3

I found one study that addresses the production of Vitamin D3: Life cycle assessment of vitamin D3 synthesis: from batch to photo-high p,T (Springer Link HTML, data table HTML, DOI). The functional unit of analysis is 1,000 mg crystalline vitamin D3. In terms of dosage, 1000 mg of crystalline D3 is equivalent to 40,000,000 IU. Assuming a daily dose of 1000 ...


3

For a low-activity lifestyle, foods that contain at least 10% protein (by energy) are key. Assuming a dietary target of 55 g protein and 2200 kcal total energy per day, 10% of energy must be provided by protein to meet the target. Individual foods that contain less than 10% protein by energy are fine, as long as they are balanced with foods that contain ...


3

Iron is available in dark leafy greens but still is a concern being less bioavailable than from meat. Iron absorbs better when eaten along with vitamin C so a balanced diet ought to prevent anemia but supplements may be considered, particularly for women as their Iron requirements are higher. Note that it is inadvisable to take Iron supplements if you don't ...


2

The think tank Organisation for the Prevention of Intense Suffering provides the following list: Essential: Vitamin B12, 10-50 µg daily (can also be obtained from a multivitamin) Essential if not regularly consuming iodised salt or seaweed: Iodine, 150 µg daily (can also be obtained from a multivitamin) Strongly recommended if getting little sun exposure: ...


2

All fruits and vegetables have protein. The daily Recommended Dietary Intake (DRI) is 0.8 gram per kilogram of weight. That means, for a person who weighs 150 lbs (68 kg), ze should consume 68 x 0.8 g = 54.4 g protein. According to Healthline.com, MedicalNewsToday.com, MyFoodData.com - 1 medium stalk of broccoli has 4.26 g protein - 1 cup of peas has 8.5 ...


1

Meat and animal protein is not a source of Vitamin C nor is sun exposure a source of Vitamin C. Fruits and Vegetables are the primary source of Vitamin C and neither a Vegetarian or Vegan diet are a cause of Vitamin C deficiency. From your question, perhaps you are thinking of Vitamin D? For sources of vitamin C, you can have a look here. You might also ...


1

There are lots of protein-enhanced foods: flavored Water cereal protein bar bread shakes However, the problem is not that simple because sometimes is not obvious if the food qualifies as raw food (did getting the proteins to be added involved high temperatures?). Also, as the same source mentions there might be some health issues associated with adding ...


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