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The thresholds are a little fuzzy -- in researching this, I found 40-49°C, 42°C, and 48°C as the cited upper limit. Regardless of the exact number... From Raw Food Diet FAQ, heating above that point allegedly: Kills enzymes. Enzymes help you digest your food. Your body can create enzymes but that process takes a lot of energy. This process makes you ...


6

The question is indeed very broad, but it can receive an answer. I think that one should always consider benefits and side-effects/risks, so I will include some information about both. Health benefits (claim) enzymes preservation - according to this source, The idea behind this diet is that heating breaks down useful enzymes in a food. These enzymes ...


6

Around this temperature, enzymes (which are complex protein structures) begin to denature, and this is usually cited as the reason for setting a temperature threshold here. See Raw foodism on wikipedia article on The Spruce, typical of those I surveyed and agrees with what I've read elsewhere As the wikipedia article points out, enzymes are broken down by ...


5

According to Arthritis Research UK, there is some evidence of vegan diet improving medical condition of people suffering from arthritis. This may be part of due to lack of red meat in such diet, which has been found to be linked to increased risk of this illness. Another culprit that lacks in vegan/raw diets which is mentioned with regard to arthritis is ...


4

Energy is usually not a concern since lots of fresh and sundried fruits have plenty of calories. However, the word "energy" has also another meaning: "vitality". In other words, some lack of nutrients can make you feel weak and "without energy". It's definitely possible to have a complete and balanced diet with raw food. You should check whether you might ...


4

Results seem to be mixed, some studies show a positive effect, others no effect at all. The studies referenced by Arthritis Research suggest that going vegan seems to show better results than being vegetarian. Going vegetarian or vegan may have the additional benefit that you're more likely to lose weight over time which will put less strain on your joints. ...


3

For a low-activity lifestyle, foods that contain at least 10% protein (by energy) are key. Assuming a dietary target of 55 g protein and 2200 kcal total energy per day, 10% of energy must be provided by protein to meet the target. Individual foods that contain less than 10% protein by energy are fine, as long as they are balanced with foods that contain ...


2

The process of cooking food results in a decrease in total nutrient content. In many cases, cooking increases the bioavailability of nutrients, both by making the foods easier to digest and making foods taste better so that you eat more of them. These effects vary for each nutrient, and cooking method. A few examples Vegetables and calcium Boiling ...


1

All fruits and vegetables have protein. The daily Recommended Dietary Intake (DRI) is 0.8 gram per kilogram of weight. That means, for a person who weighs 150 lbs (68 kg), ze should consume 68 x 0.8 g = 54.4 g protein. According to Healthline.com, MedicalNewsToday.com, MyFoodData.com - 1 medium stalk of broccoli has 4.26 g protein - 1 cup of peas has 8.5 ...


1

There are lots of protein-enhanced foods: flavored Water cereal protein bar bread shakes However, the problem is not that simple because sometimes is not obvious if the food qualifies as raw food (did getting the proteins to be added involved high temperatures?). Also, as the same source mentions there might be some health issues associated with adding ...


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