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31

Yes, according to a paper by the American Society for Clinical Nutrition. (NIH link here) Results: Our review of the 6 studies found the following trends: 1) a very low meat intake was associated with a significant decrease in risk of death in 4 studies, a nonsignificant decrease in risk of death in the fifth study, and virtually no association in the ...


15

There are studies. Short answer is: No, soy doesn't give guys boobs. Paper "Hormonal Effects of Soy in Premenopausal Women and Men" clearly states there is a weak effect upon (cis)women and no adverse effect upon (cis)men. “Soy and isoflavone consumption does not seem to affect the endometrium in premenopausal women, although there have been weak ...


13

With a vegan diet you're not sure to lose weight but you're very likely to. According to a research paper, based on about 65 thousands of people, vegans were showing lower BMI than vegetarians and omnivorous (this means they were thinner). Also in several other clinical trials (Barnard 2009; Jenkins 2009; Barnard 2005; Barnard 2006; Ornish 1998) the ...


13

One difference between animal protein and plant protein is that plant protein breaks down much more quickly than animal protein (which is why that feeling of being horribly full for a long time after eating lots of animal protein doesn't usually happen with plant protein). This is why some ultra athletes say they prefer plant protein when you need to eat as ...


13

Okinawa Japanese is one of the populations with the longest life span. Their average life span is 77 for men and 86 for women. They eat to 80% fullness and rely very heavily on whole unrefined plants. 70% of their total calories comes from sweet potatoes. They eat essentially no meat, eggs, dairy, no sugar, no oil, but they do have very small amounts of fish....


13

The study is still "valid" in the sense that PLOS One has not retracted the publication. This means the work was done in good faith and the methodology is acceptable, but it does not necessarily mean the results should be accepted as truth. To assess validity of the study we should look at comments and criticisms. Because of the significant media attention, ...


12

A very good article regarding vegetarian eating for children and adolescents, from a medical source can be found here. It is quite long and covers the main problems related to possible nutritional deficiencies: protein, Cobalamin (B12), Iron, Zinc, Calcium, Vitamin D, Omega-3 Fatty Acids. It also covers possible growth and Development Issues. Short answer ...


12

No, it is not safe. And there are no significant benefits to make up for the impact on your health. First up, fruit is very high in the sugar fructose. The idea that this is "healthy" fructose compared to the corn-syrup derived fructose found in processed foods is a misconception. The only difference is that when you consume fruit, you are also consuming ...


12

This depends on the B12 status the person had initially, and probably on other unknown individual factors. While there are no proven natural wholefood sources of B12 that are vegan, it's possible that some people obtain small quantities of B12 from unrecognised or incidental sources (since B12 is produced by soil bacteria) while others do not, so it's ...


10

Yes! You're completely safe to blend in the pit in terms of healthiness. However, I make no guarantee your blender won't go kaboom. More information regarding the seeds. Do note that other components of the mango plant can be toxic: Mango stems, skin, and leaves can cause irritation in people who are sensitive to urushiol, the oil that causes a rash in ...


10

This question is similar to this one, except that the referenced one is about vegetarianism and this one about veganism. The answer provided there, also applies to this one, as the referenced source clearly includes vegan diet (my emphasis): It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total ...


10

Raw potatoes are hard to digest, littered with various kinds of bacteria and are toxic. Most of the toxins can be eliminated by peeling. That still leaves rather hard to digest starches. All in all, eating raw potatoes is not recommended. As explained in Nutrition Mythbusters page, potatoes can make you sick in a number of ways: indigestible starch (also ...


10

Heterocylic amines specifically are only created by cooking muscle meat at high temperature. The formation requires creatine, which is not found in vegetables and so cooked veggies can't form heterocylic amines. However, charred vegetables may have different carcinogens to be aware of. HCAs are the result of a specific recipe of amino acids and creatine, ...


10

Methods that appear to be reliably vegan: Rhythm method (tracking menstrual cycle to avoid intercourse around ovulation) Withdrawal (avoiding ejaculation in/on the vagina) Sterilization (tubal ligation or vasectomy) A copper IUD (intrauterine device), although investigation into whether a particular company or IUD used animal testing would be advisable ...


10

While I appreciate the orientation towards an analytical, scientific and health perspective here, I have not ignored culinary considerations where they seemed important. This post is a work in progress. I will try to keep updating it as I learn more. General theory Beans, legumes, grains, nuts and, uh, seeds are all the seeds of the plant they come from. ...


9

Fruits are missing niacin, thiamine, and b12. There are also caloric challenges with sticking to a pure fruit diet. Grains and nuts provide necessary protein that the human body requires as well. An alternative to a complete commitment to full-time fruit diet is to on occasion implement this diet. Some religions call for partial fasts in which adherents ...


9

Yes, definitely. There are several investigations assessing this issue. In several clinical trials (1, 2) Dr. Barnard has prooved that a low-fat vegan diet can improve serum values of HbA1c and requirements for medication of patients affected by type 2 diabetes. The same studies found significant improvements in plasma lipids (LDL and total cholesterols), ...


9

There are many medical conditions that call for dietary restrictions. For example: irritable bowel syndrome allergies migraines gluten sensitivity When a person has a combination of medical conditions, it can be very hard to find foods that satisfy all the restrictions. I have a friend with several allergies and migraines. After removing all allergens and ...


9

1. General vegetarians (Non-vegans) For non-vegans, dairy products seems to be the best source, as mentioned in other answers as well. List of top 4 (I'm excluding eggs): 1: Cheese The amount of vitamin B12 in cheese depends on type and variety, Swiss cheese provides the most with 3.34μg per 100g serving (56% DV), followed by Gjetost(40% DV), Mozzarella(39% ...


9

This is really just a matter of 'let me google it for you'. The first hit yields a nice list. Interestingly, there are endurance athletes as well as strength athletes. My favorites: Catra Corbett, ultra marathoner and general badass Carl Lewis, sprinter, long jumper and multiple Olympic gold medalist Brendan Brazier, iron man triathlete and author ...


9

The truth about the natural diet is that our ancestors were eating whatever they could get their hands on. They could digest meat as well as vegetables. Some humans have been fed mainly bread their whole life. Some people were eating only meat like some game-following nomads in the north of Canada, and some people were strictly vegetarian (maybe in India?). ...


8

One aspect of "protein quality" refers to how close a type of protein is to being "complete", i.e. containing all the nine essential amino acids in sufficient amounts. Most meat, fish, whey (milk protein) and eggs are complete protein sources. As covered in other questions, there are many vegan complete protein sources as well, such as soy beans, lentils ...


8

The health benefits of gelatine In a review of available evidence for gelatines effects on joint health, the European Food Safety Authority writes that: In weighing the evidence, the Panel took into account that one study in physically active humans did not show an effect of collagen hydrolysate on joint discomfort, and that studies in animals and in ...


8

This answer would be most likely the same for a non-veg*n question, since there is nothing specific that you should look out for as a result of your diet. The bones are made mostly out of rigid form of collagen, which is a protein and composes the organic part of the bone and calcium phosphate and other salts, which create the hard outer layer. [1] Based ...


7

Both of those ingredients may be from plant sources (for example, cacao and shea butters both contain stearic acid). Producers of cosmetics are getting better at labelling for vegans. I advise you to check the labels of a range of products; many companies produce vegan moisturisers. You can also use single-ingredient products like cocoa butter or shea ...


7

Your concerns about GMOs and food processing apply more broadly than this specific food, and I would recommend looking into each issue in general rather than in regards to seitan specifically. Seitan and GMOs The scientific consensus on genetically modified or engineered foods is that they pose no health risks. As such, the use of GMOs to make seitan ...


7

I will try to answer your question based on the types of saturated fats that some vegetable sources contain as compared to animal sources. The presumably two biggest sources of saturated fats in vegan diet are coconut products (notably coconut oil) and palm oil. Other sources can be various nuts, non-exotic oils, cacao etc. but these contain smaller amounts ...


7

The E stands for Europe so this advice is valid for all the EU. Here or here you can find a list of those E numbers that are not vegetarian/vegan and here you can find another which also specifies the different functions of the veg-friendly ones.


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