17

Yes, but because you need to learn what the heck you are going to eat. (And supplement.) People misunderstand why transition is necessary. Your body can handle new foods just fine. I am more worried about your psychology adjusting, now that "becoming full" might not be telling you what it used to. I wrote this up in a short article which I will ...


16

It's actually possible for children to be vegan from any age, assuming they are breastfed (see If vegans don't drink milk, why are they okay with breastfeeding?) or appropriate formula can be sourced (vegan infant formula is rather difficult to get hold of though). You can introduce vegan "milk" products from age 1 (soya, rice, oat or almond milk) - ...


15

Short answer: Most likely not. Long answer: A sudden transition from a vegetarian diet to an omnivorous one will clearly have some effects, as any sudden change in diet will have. According to this article, these problems may appear: A person might have a little problem if he or she started right out on a huge steak. Their body might not have ...


14

I recently transitioned from non-vegetarian to vegan (since May, 2016) I'll be answering based on my own personal experience not something backed up by research or facts. Going cold turkey can be tough. There are a lot of items to keep an eye out for when shopping for food and other items. I found that it was easier to cut out meat and seafood first. Then,...


11

It's hard to find quantitative data on your specific question. Even on vegetarianism and veganism in general, there are only very few quantitative and representative scientific studies. Faunalytics published a Study of Current and Former Vegetarians and Vegans in 2014, indicating that people who were raised vegetarian might be less likely to abandon ...


10

No, these fake meats are not necessary for a good vegetarian diet. In my opinion, they are mostly not tasty, fatty and not healthy. Also, heavily processed food, like they often are, reduces the positive effect a vegetarian diet has on the planet. There are tons of great vegetarian bbq recipes in the net. I especially recommend stuffed mushrooms or ...


9

No need to. I was a teenager when I transitioned and it was cold turkey. Few pieces of advice: Try to change as little as possible. For instance, replace milk with almond milk, meat with soy protein, refined sugar with organic brown sugar. Take B12 supplements. If you don't live in a tropical country, also take D vitamin supplements. Increase your ...


8

Yes, it's actually possible for children to be vegan from any age, but please read carefully the sections "Calcium and vitamin D" and "Vitamin B-12" (among others) in the above provided link (it's actually possible for children to be vegan from any age. And make a registered dietitian to elaborate you a diet for your children, as the document says: ...


8

I'm a lacto-ovo vegetarian of six years so far. I go vegan occasionally for a month or so at a time. I experienced a learning curve the first time I went vegan in the thought process in what I eat and how I shopped. I had to pay much closer attention to ingredients, where I ate, and what products I used. That amount of detail might be off-putting to some. ...


8

Yes, it's possible. I wouldn't say it's a guarantee though. I was raised vegetarian and haven't had more than two or three meals with meat in my life (tried it, didn't like it). I can always tell when I've accidentally consumed meat. The last time was a potato dish that had bacon in it (why??). It makes me sick, but not usually for more than the rest of ...


7

Vegetarianism is a diet that refrains from consuming the flesh of animals, sometimes for religious, spiritual or ethical reasons, sometimes following tradition or culture, and sometimes for health concerns. People who had become vegetarian on ethical grounds in an effort to avoid being personally responsible of harm or cruelty to animals, may later learn ...


7

I have some experience with this. After being vegetarian for a couple years, I started eating meat again a couple times, mostly while on trips. I didn't observe any major side effects. My digestion tends to get a bit messed up at the start, but it never was any worse than the usual travel related / not being used to the food kind of feeling. I noticed ...


6

You might experience side effects such as gas from too many beans, or a stomach ache from too much fiber, but those can be avoided by eating a varied selection of foods, and might not even be an issue depending on what kind of diet you're transitioning from. As long as you're able to put together a meal plan that provides the correct nutrients there's no ...


5

With such a long list of allergies, you should seek professional advice rather than hope to find it on the internet. Certainly, this long list of allergies will mean that becoming vegetarian or vegan will be a significant challenge. Vegetarian may be a sensible starting point or compromise. You have not mentioned eggs and milk in your list of ...


5

In my experience of food counselor I've met several people who turned vegan without a transition time, and they were enjoying a plentiful life. So I can definitely say transition time is not necessary, but can be useful to get used to all changes of several kinds that are more related to social lifestyle (e.g learning to cook, how to deal with social ...


4

No, I don't think it's necessary. Many people become Vegetarian first and transition to Vegan. This is more a developing change an ethics and culture. I've never heard of anyone on a Vegan or Vegetarian diet not "feeling full". In practice many Vegetarians eat Vegan for weeks on end anyway, some without meaning to. There are no immediate health risks with ...


4

It can happen but it depends on your medical situation. I wouldn't describe it as an allergy but some people are intolerant to meat. I literally haven't been able to stomach meat for a very long time. Initially I thought this may be psychosomatic, having caught rotavirus while having surgery as a child (and outright refusing to eat meat for some time ...


4

Switching to a vegetarian diet can have numerous side effects, but they can be countered. Two of the most common issues are increased flatulence and bloating. This is primarily due to a large uptick in fiber consumption, and will eventually level out, or can be avoided by selecting less fibrous foods. Anemia, protein deficiency, osteoporosis and vitamin ...


4

To address the 'ecology' side of your question, there are a few factors to consider: How much meat/fish you are eating in both scenarios - probably an obvious one How is the fish caught? Pole and line is the most sustainable method, as it minimises capturing endangered species, non-relevant species (dolphins, sharks) and damaging the ocean floor which ...


3

If a lot of your meals tend to contain beans of any sort, it can cause this issue. Reportedly, if you use the Mexican spice, Epazote (available on Amazon) when cooking your meal containing beans, you will see an improvement. I haven't tried it myself yet but I've bought some to test with and will update


3

I travel quite a bit and for me using apps like Happy Cow ,which locates veg*n restaurants near you, has been very useful. You can try using this kind of apps to look for something that is both healthy and suits your tastes. Personally I don't focus much in the healthy eating aspect when I travel. I prefer enjoying the local food and discovering new dishes ...


3

Do you know what you're going to eat tomorrow? Can you make a meal plan that you'll stick to for a week (or a month) right now? If you can't from the top of your head, think about the time you need to find a recipe and cook (maybe that's super easy because you know how to cook and you have an awesome cookbook!). If you need lots of time, being vegetarian ...


3

There are tests for allergies in a lot of countries, you should check with your personal doctor or if there is any clinic close to you that provide them, That should be your first step, even if you are not going to convert to vegan you should get check up to be able to adapt your diet to your allergies without been afraid to what or not you could eat. After ...


2

The best arguments for or against a transition period have to do with habits. We need approximately 30 days to form a new habit. If we really want to go vegetarian or vegan, we can do so right away, but in order to follow through, we might need to have some contingency plans in place. New vegans are still going to announce, spontaneously “Let’s eat lunch ...


2

There is no evidence that you should have bovine lactose (cows milk), and the case for calcium from milk is weak at best. Human milk is the best milk for humans. Cow's milk drinkers risk a variety of complications, like Type 1 diabetes, colic (from the mother's consumption), and childhood obesity. Please see the following videos based on peer-reviewed ...


2

I'm vegan and travel the world a lot. Some of my advice: I always bring a bunch of protein bars with me I find out the word and definition of 'vegan' in the language(s) where I'm travelling I go to Subway, Whole Foods, or similar chains when I'm not sure (assuming they exist) I buy a lot of fresh fruits / veggies that can be eaten raw (and I try to find ...


2

I've written a small handbook called "Tiny Guide for the Vegan traveler. Survival manual for travelers and workers who don’t have a place to cook" You can download it from Google Drive here Good luck!


1

Maybe you can keep a small supply of whole grain snacks with you, like roasted grams, peanuts. You can also keep some dry fruits with you. These will supplement your "junk" diet on the road. In restaurants/eateries try ordering stuff which is easy to make, like vegetable sandwiches. They will be less likely to be stale/unhealthy. Also visit local shops​...


1

No, meat substitutes are not necessary nutritionally or socially or otherwise. Grilled vegetables are great at a BBQs! The following items are great on the grill. Either put a fine metal mesh over the grill to prevent it from falling through (easy) or put them on skewers: Onion, tomato, mushrooms, corn (on the cobb), asparagus, squash, zucchini, etc All of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible