12

That's okara! :) It's a traditional food in Japan, Korea and China While relatively flavourless when eaten on its own, it can be used in stews such as the Korean biji-jjigae or in porridges. It's also used as an addition to baked goods such as breads, cookies and muffins, and can serve to create a crumbly texture in these foods. In Japan it is used in a ...


9

Traditional dumpling sauces should be vegetarian already. For example, Japanese gyoza are served with shoyu (soy sauce), komezu (rice vinegar), goma abura (sesame oil), and chilli oil (optional). I see no reason why you couldn't use these with veggie dumplings. Check that products from South East Asia do not contain fish sauce but this should not be an issue ...


8

Traditional egg nog uses eggs, dairy, sugar, booze, and nutmeg. All of these are actually (lacto-ovo) vegetarian ingredients. If you want to make a fully vegan "egg" nog, eggs and dairy can't be used. The good news, though, is that those aren't the primary flavor characteristics of the drink! I don't get nostalgic about drinking raw eggs, I'm interested in ...


8

I found plenty of resources online: Vegan poutine: https://itdoesnttastelikechicken.com/the-ultimate-vegan-poutine/ Vegan Mozzarella https://gourmandelle.com/how-to-make-stretchy-vegan-mozzarella-cheese/ Vegan Gravy https://www.connoisseurusveg.com/vegan-gravy/ Mix it up and you are done. For the poutine, you can also dice some champignons and brown ...


7

You seem to be asking two questions. One about safety of fermentation, the other about how to make rice mylk (safely). While I cannot answer the latter I can answer the former. The difference between fermentation and spoilage is about control. With spoilage random species of micro organisms (bacteria or fungi) make up the majority of those processing the ...


6

I find the best substitute to for eggs is aquafaba (the liquid in a can of chickpeas). You can also make it yourself if you cook chickpeas at home, just reduce the water you cooked them in until it's slimy like egg whites. 3 tbsp of aquafaba = 1 egg. I use it as a substitute for eggs everywhere. Baking, mayo, pancakes, etc.


6

I never use any egg substitute and I don't have any trouble... Here's my method: Savoury: half and half gram/chickpea flour and buckwheat flour oat or soya mylk (or whatever you like) salt, herbs etc, to taste use rapeseed oil to cook Sweet: half and half buckwheat flour and chestnut flour hazelnut or buckwheat mylk (or whatever you like) vanilla extract,...


6

Here's an article on kosherfrugal.com that tells how to make vegan ice cream. (Full disclosure: I do have an affiliation with this website.) Ingredients: 1 cup chick pea cooking liquid 1/8 tsp cream of tartar 1/2 cup sugar 2-3 vanilla beans And the the instructions: First, I put the chick pea liquid and cream of tartar in my mixing bowl, and ...


6

SodaStream syrups are all vegetarian given that their primary ingredients are sweeteners. No meat or fish products are used in common commercialized syrups. SodaStream has confirmed that its Fruit Drops are 100% vegan, while most of their other syrups are "vegan-friendly." If you are still unsure about the ingredients of a SodaStream syrup, consider trying ...


5

Not only is it possible, it's pretty easy! Mexican food lends itself to being vegan with some simple substitutes because in a lot of recipes things like beans, rice, tomatoes, corn and other vegetables are the stars of the show rather than a side dish. In a basic bean burrito recipe you'd probably only need to swap dairy cheese for vegan cheese. There's ...


5

It's straightforward to make oat milk and you only need oats, water, a blender, and a means of straining the mixture finely, such as a muslin sheet (cheesecloth) or nut milk bag, or even a fine coffee strainer. Because oats are mild tasting, it's important to use good tasting water (filter your source as needed if possible). I like to add about half a ...


5

To add to the accepted answer, there are multiple types of kit for sale that help make this process way easier. I've been making a lot more oat milk since we got this. To use it I just shake some unsoaked, regular rolled oats into the inner container (after sliding it into the right container), add water and go to town with a blender. After that you use the ...


5

I like making low oil paratha and spreading strawberry jam on top as a health substitute for a donut. Actually, I sometimes take a bite out of the center and call it an Indian donut. Rolling out the dough takes a little practice but you get good at it fast, the first one you fry may just be a taste tester.


4

I'm too lazy to use it as a filler in baked goods, something I don't make often. However, I do eat musli or oatmeal every morning, so I mix it in there. This is one of the few things I eat at the same rate that I create fake milk. I pretty much do the same thing with all the left over solids from nut, bean or other milks.


4

A second, "no machine" answer with the lowest chance of crystals: You have to do the oldfashioned process, which was used before people automated it. First, you need the freezing container. Take two steel bowls that fit into each other, with 2 cm or more gap. Find some way to fix them so the small one is within the large one, but hovering above the bottom ...


4

TL;DR: use one tablespoon of flaxseed meal per egg as a drop in substitute for eggs in baking. To avoid clumping, soak the flaxseed meal in an equal volume of water first or add the flaxseed meal to the recipe last. Eggs serve a few main purposes in baking, they: provide structure provide some leavening provide water, macronutrients, and flavor function as ...


4

I have a recipe for okonomiyaki from the book Cooking with Soy by Yoshiko Takeuchi It suggests using ground flaxseed as a substitute for egg. I find ground and beaten flaxseed an effective replacement for egg in baking. I like to whip it with soymilk, but this recipe uses water. The recipe incorporates okara, which gives it a more substantial, less dense ...


4

Fermentation is not the process you are looking for. What you want is mashing, which is the process of converting starches to sugars via the use of alpha-amylase proteins (aka enzymes). You will get the most information on this from the home brewing community, since mashing is the first step of an all-grain brewing process. Rice contains no natural a-...


4

It sounds like you may wanna give oat milk a shot. Since you seem particular about what contents you want in it as well as what general location you wanna buy it in, I will suggest making it yourself, as it is quick, easy, and cheap to do so. Not to mention, you will end up with a product consisting entirely of water and oats (+whatever optional sweetener ...


4

As you can use vegetable suet and many recipes don't use milk, presumably the main issue is the eggs. Egg-free christmas pudding recipes aren't uncommon-- examples: From the Guardian (also no alcohol or gluten; vegetable suet would be easier than grating pure veg fat but would bring in gluten that they didn't want) A 1940s recipe (this calls for alcohol or ...


4

Seitan would be a great substitute, one of the recipes I use can be found here. You can spice the seitan appropriately for the recipe by adjusting the spices in the seitan recipe. You could either slice the loaves to the appropriate shape right away, or grind it (using a standard meat grinder or similar) and then press the ground seitan, possibly with some ...


4

Most of the ingredients you've listed are unprocessed vegetables, fruits, or seasonings all of which are already vegan. There are only two ingredients which might raise concern: pasta and croutons. Pasta is usually purchased in one of three ways. Dry pasta in a box is almost always vegan, with only basic ingredients like semolina and wheat flour. This dry ...


3

I have been told by more kitchen-savvy friends that aqua-faba is an effective replacement for egg in baking. Aqua faba is essentially the runoff from tinned chickpeas and you can easily just use that directly, or there are suppliers that sell a more refined version. I can't speak for it myself, but having tried cakes baked using it, they've been ...


3

Grated cauliflower makes a surprisingly decent textural substitute for ground or minced meat, for those not keen on using processed substitutes. This idea comes from Richa Hingle's cookbook, Vegan Richa's Indian Kitchen, but her recipe uses lots of lovely spices to flavour it, so don't blame Richa if you don't like my recipe! Here is the basic method I use ...


3

Short answer: You don't use the meat. In my experience, it tends to taste just fine if the herbs are right. Longer (still short though) answer: You use a ground meat vegetarian substitute. This would depend on the kind of meat substitutes commonly available in your country. I see that you are from the US, so you should not have much trouble with this. I ...


3

I know you said you don't want it "expensive" or "fancy", but I must say that your requirements are in direct contradiction with each other. Specifically, the "no crystals" part is actually a continuum - all of the machine-free methods produce some amount of crystals, and when buying a machine, you need a complex, well-engineered one to get a low amount of ...


3

Energy-dense and simple to prepare Basically everything that is high in carbs, low in water content and can be prepared by boiling for less than 15 minutes in one pot: Rice (can't be whole rice, or it will take long to cook) Pasta (whole wheat) Oatmeal Couscous Quinoa Add some red lentils or split peas right into the same pot for quick-cooking proteins. ...


3

This recipe by Mihl covers the first two requirements, but I'm not sure if it melts in hot chocolate because I haven't tested that myself. As copied from the recipe itself, here are the ingredients: For the marshmallows 120 ml (1/2 cup) plus 60 ml (1/4 cup) water 2 teaspoons agar powder 200 g (1 cup) sugar 100 g (1/3 cup) syrup (see notes above) 120 ml (1/...


3

Yes, it's possible. A quick internet search for vegan chocolate mint cake reveals this is a common choice and there are many recipes you or your friend can follow. I have tried this one myself and I am pleased, but that is of course subjective. Making cakes could be somewhat involved if you are not into cooking, but this is not different from non-vegan ...


3

To make a creamy cheese-like substance I use this recipe: Peel and boil together 1 potato, 1 carrot and 1 onion until soft. Keep the cook water, amount used depends on how much cheese you want and how viscous. Put cooked ingredients with water into a blender. Add nutritional yeast, curcuma for colour, perhaps some miso paste. Blend again when hot. It's ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible