7

The number one rule when dealing with any food that might have come into contact with animals or animal feces is to wash it. I could not find any other numbers than those from a study conducted in Ethiopia which notes that It was also observed that decreased parasitic contamination was significantly associated with washing the products before displaying ...


6

It's animal-based. As @jsotola said in the comments, "vegetable tanned leather" means animal hide tanned with plant substances rather than with, for instance, chromium sulphate. "Vegetable-tanned leather", in other words, rather than "tanned vegetable leather" There are, in fact, some very successful vegan leather substitutes ...


5

According to the Centre for Science and Environment Washing with 2% of salt water will remove most of the contact pesticide residues that normally appear on the surface of the vegetables and fruits ... fruity vegetables like tomatoes, brinjal and okra require two to three washings. 2% is not really salty enough to affect the taste but if you want you can ...


4

Traditional dumpling sauces should be vegetarian already. For example, Japanese gyoza are served with shoyu (soy sauce), komezu (rice vinegar), goma abura (sesame oil), and chilli oil (optional). I see no reason why you couldn't use these with veggie dumplings. Check that products from South East Asia do not contain fish sauce but this should not be an issue ...


3

All vegetables can help reduce body fat, IF they are consumed as part of a calorie-controlled diet. The only way to reduce body fat is to maintain a calorific deficit. Therefore, substituting high-calorie foods with low calorie foods such as vegetables, has the potential to reduce body fat. However, simply adding vegetables to your diet will not result in ...


3

I'm going to go out on a limb here and suggest that it's meant to be either artichoke... Or, more likely, bamboo shoot By the way, I think the one you suggested could be fennel is more likely to be pak choi :) White radish (mooli) looks like this: So the white thing top left may perhaps be kohlrabi or just an ordinary turnip


2

As mentioned in comments, here's an unofficial, but comprehensive information about the shelf life of common vegetables and there's a well referenced answer on Cooking SE about the shelf life of a variety of foods. Now, the question was about health hazards of eating old vegetables. For "at home" purpose, there is a suggestion to "look, smell and test it." ...


1

It looks as though it might be yu choy sum


1

I've read a lot about the costs and benefits of conventional farming versus organic farming, so I just wanted to share these two credible sources. They address some common myths about organic farming in the US (I apologize if you live elsewhere, as I'm not familiar with these practices in other countries): Scientific American: Mythbusting 101: Organic ...


1

As you state, organic does not mean that it does not contain pesticides. Standards on what organic food means vary significantly worldwide. Costs aside... Organic farming features practices that cycle resources, promote ecological balance, and conserve biodiversity. But doctors say, answering your question There's really very limited information in ...


1

There's actually significant variation between the cultivars. Here's a comparison of macronutrients in each food based on a 100 gram sample. Macronutrients Total food energy (ie. calories) ranges from 25 kcal (cauliflower, cabbage) to 50 kcal (kale). Similar variation is observed in macronutrient ratios. Protein content is lowest in cabbage (12.6%) and ...


1

There is a ton of recipes on a google search One I suggest - https://www.forksoverknives.com/plant-based-cooking-how-to-cook-without-oil/#gs._knr2Zk Choose Your Oil-Free Cooking Method Sautéing and stir-frying—The most common question I get on this topic is how to sauté or stir-fry without butter or oil. The trick is to use small amounts of ...


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