7

We had this colleague who never wanted to go to a restaurant with us because she was Vegan... Someone told her to bring her own food and still come with us and she did. Whenever a restaurant refused her to get her own food out of her back-pack, we all got up and left. If the restaurant pointed out they had Vegetarian options, she educated them what they ...


6

It is not easy to tell if a candle is vegan because usually there is not a lot of information available about the ingredients. As was mentioned earlier in a comment candles can be made out of paraffin which is a petroleum derivate; most of the cheapest ones are going to be made of that, or of soy wax for instance. On the other hand, the "premium" stuff is ...


6

One method is to ask for veg* options, even if you know they will say "no". By the number of requests the managers of the restaurants will understand that there's a demand for veg options and will increase their offer. Recently the Brazilian Vegetarian Society opened a position for a campaigner in charge of counseling restaurants and fast-foods on how to ...


5

I think that for such labels, contacting associations could be a start. Creating a label is certainly a lot of work since you have to create all the rules that will reign over a veg*n product and make it strong and famous so that it will be a positive differentiation for goods producers and customers. That's why think associations are the place where a veg*...


4

Besides reading the labeling and testing the smell, there are some things you can look for: Looking very closely, does it have pores (real) or only a pressed texture (fake)? The hair follicles provide the grain pattern that is so much a feature of the value of the leather... In most animals the grain pattern is uniform, in terms of both regularity and ...


3

Social Media is, in my opinion, the most powerful tool in this regard. Either through mass organisation by online Vegan communities (like the ones on Reddit/Facebook/Instagram etc.) or just a couple of lone Vegans constantly poking a company over Twitter to provide an option, I've seen it work so many times. It may attract some anti-Vegan trolling in the ...


3

I'm basing my answer from this WikiHow article as well as those two french article consoglobr and sanscroquettesfixes. Here is what you should remember about them: By the aspect Real fur has a leather base. Generally, the real fur is thick, with a part of fine hairs more curly, and longs hairs that divide when you blow on it. Most faux fur products have ...


2

Marks and Spencer seem to have a few options, I found a list here of their vegan foods (confectionery starts on page 4), this link is dated 10th Feb 2017, but includes an email contact to get an up-to-date list. I've only tried the Mocktail Jellies, which are quite a bit softer than a Haribo type sweet, but some of the other sweets on the list seem like ...


2

I don't know if the German brand Haribo is available in the UK, they (and probably others) make a kind of vegan gummy. While they sell dozens of different shapes, this kind is called "gummi pasta" and doesn't use gelatin. You might find that other similar "hard gummies" are vegan.


1

Searching on the Amazon (since you posted your example from there) I was able to easily find either these or these earmuffs. Neither of those match your preferred style perfectly, with the first ones having a thin connecting part (and by the way, I have seen this style of earmuffs with vegan materials in loads of clothing shops in the UK, for example in ...


1

Jelly tots are vegan. Here is an official source, it's a list of vegan products by Nestlé.


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