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Globally The Census of Marine Life concluded in 2010 that 90 percent of the large fish are gone, primarily because of overfishing. This includes many of the fish we love to eat, like Atlantic salmon, tuna, halibut, swordfish, Atlantic cod. If we don’t allow for proper recovery, these fish risk total extinction. Novogratz, A. and Velings, M. (2014). The ...


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That's an interesting question. According to this article fisheries can recover even in ten years, so much faster than "a few human generations": The team ran computer simulations on a massive database of 4,713 fisheries, representing about 78 percent of worldwide fishing activity. By 2050, global fish populations could double if all countries ...


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There are many ways to assess whether human activities are "good for the environment" but when it comes to eating fish, the major concern is about rapidly declining fish populations in all oceans around the world. I suggest checking out these related questions: How big is the impact that humans have on the emptiness of oceans? How long would it take for ...


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There is a lot of uncertainty around marine ecosystem recovery. In some areas, there are concerns that even if all fishing stopped, the ecosystem would never return to it's former state. Part of the reason is that over fishing is not the only factor effecting marine life. Warming waters and increased extreme weather also have a large impact. The Gulf of ...


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