27

My mum was concerned about my health and wellbeing when I transitioned from vegetarianism to veganism, but I was not living at home at the time. What I did was constantly talk about the great food I was eating, sending pictures to my family of the beautiful food I was cooking and eating out and about and telling them how delicious it was. My parents have ...


17

In my personal experience there is one thing that made my family more open to the idea of veganism and that vegan food is not bland and boring (one of the major concerns my family also had). Cook for them. This is the best way of showing anyone that vegan food is not boring and that it can be very tasty, if they try it and like it, it will make the process ...


16

The host generally makes the rules for an event, so a condition like that is entirely appropriate. If they have dietary/medical needs that they feel cannot be met by vegan means, you might want to ask them to check with you The way you explain the expectation is going to be entirely culture-dependent. One possibility is including verbiage along the lines ...


14

Lots of good answers already but I may have an additional viewpoint to offer. Background: My sister started being Vegan about 6 years ago. I was not very supportive and did all the negative things you mention. I came at her with all the uninformed arguments I knew at the time. "Humans need meat to survive" "If we didn't eat cows they wouldn't exist" "...


9

Generally speaking, covering a non-vegan's meal expense does not sit right with me, and technically certainly is not vegan. But I feel there is a time to make an exception. I have a house rule of no meat allowed into my home. This is non-negotiable, as it is my safe zone. But when I am at a restaurant, eating from cookware that also cooked meat, trusting ...


9

Context: 10 years ago I made some hefty nutrition changes in my life (it wasn't about being vegan, but I won't go into it here, as it does not matter). Let's suffice to say that it was borderline revolutionary for my larger family then -- and it is perfectly accepted and not mentioned at all anymore, today; plus I got some of them over to do it my way, as ...


8

Find a means to distract yourself. For example you could: Listen to music. Write something (a story, a shopping list etc). Read something (a book, an article, some stackexchange questions). Do some calculations (manage your finances, recite your times tables, take up maths as an actual hobby). File your taxes? (Normally this would be terrible, but as ...


8

there is a saying in India which says "iron cuts the iron". Similarly, good food can replace good food. By cooking good veg dishes , you can make room for veg food on the dinner table. You don't even have to cook, you can order from nearby Indian or italian restaurants as they usually have variety of veg options. There are umpteen recipes for veg dishes. ...


8

Just be direct with them. Say "Veganism is just my preference and is something I do because of x (health/morals/whatever) and its tiring having the same conversation each day. I'd rather talk about something else". If they continue to press, express you don't wish to continue the conversation and that you would rather go and eat elsewhere as its tiring ...


7

After 15 years of having these conversations, I've found that the most conversation dampening reply is simply "I'm vegan because I don't want to kill animals". This is said in a very matter-of-fact tone, like "it is what it is" kind of reply. I don't have any explanation why it works, but empirically that's what I've found and I use it whenever I'd like to ...


6

Veganism isn't about just eating plant based food, or avoiding leather, it's about avoiding animal exploitation whenever and wherever possible. I believe this extends to gifts and food you buy for other people. Obviously it's partly a judgment call though. Further examples, while I think donating to a charity which may inadvertently exploit animals is ...


6

Regarding your family's concern that going vegan might have adverse health effects: Have your doctor request labs for you periodically, showing that you are indeed still healthy as a vegan, and refer to these numbers whenever someone expresses concern about your health. Have them watch "Forks Over Knives" or read the corresponding book "The China Study". (...


6

When I was transitioning diets from omnivore to vegetarian and later vegan, my family has been rather surprised and prejudiced against the process as well. Here are some of the things that made this easier, in terms of both making them understand and making them to accept this. Cook them some vegan recipes. One of the most powerful tools in your hands is ...


5

How can I deal with this issue? What would be a good way of convincing them that my lifestyle is not inherently unhealthy? I know that starting a campaign to convince your family about all the positive aspects of veganism can be tempting. Even though I don't think this is wrong, I would like to point out that you shouldn't have to do that. You don't have a ...


5

Your question is a bit vague, so I'll answer the question I think you're asking ("How do I explain to meat-eaters that I'd rather not cook/handle/buy meat/animal products for ethical reasons without being rude?"). First I think we should define "rude" as some people will take offense at the mere mention of your choice to abstain from the meat industry in ...


4

I believe it is. You are the host and you are offering them a place at your table. Unless there is a medical issue preventing someone to eat what you plan to cook (allergies, perhaps?) it would actually be inappropriate for them to bring their own food. I would say your best shot is to notify them about your intentions beforehand and see what they have to ...


4

I'm going to make what I suspect will be a slightly controversial suggestion. Perhaps you could use some islamic scriptures to convince them that vegetarianism is not un-islamic (I am assuming this is a factor). A brief search on the internet lead me to a fatwa by Hamza Yusuf stating: Meat is not a necessity in Shari’ah, and in the old days most Muslims ...


4

If you've already asked them to stop, they are harrassing you. You've already tried asking tactfully, so I think you're really asking how to make them stop without being rude or making things worse. You could try... Telling them how you feel: their comments on your personal choices are making you uncomfortable, or making you feel pushed out of the group/...


4

For a facile reply, you could point out there are plenty of poisons that it is best to avoid. Should you eat a little bit of all mushrooms? Should you include a little beer, wine, gin, whiskey, etc? Tobacco? More seriously, if you want a very simple rule to encourage a healthy diet then this might not be too bad. I would then point out that a rule as ...


4

When possible, reject the present. Thank you so much. I am sorry, but I can't really accept it. While different cultures have different approaches to this, it is generally not unreasonable to reject a present if you clearly and sincerely express your gratitude for the intention. The giver might not be super happy with the outcome but would unlikely take ...


4

I think intent behind the questions is important too. Some people ask not out of judgement or to start an argument, but because they are genuinely curious. I had a boss a few years ago that always wanted to know what I was having for lunch. He had no arguments about my diet and asked some pretty good questions. He grew up a cattle rancher, and still had ...


4

It is hard to see any practical answer to this. I don't suppose that you have access to a sophisticated chemistry laboratory. I don't know how to perform this specific test but I have seen a description of how to detect fake orange juice. This relied on isotope analysis; that's not amateur science. I think that the only practical answer is trust. Do you ...


3

I just want to provide experience from the other side, perhaps it could be useful to understand some reactions: I am an omnivore and a family member, lets call that person "A", is vegetarian. Well, it is the decision of A and I accept it. It is A's responsibility and I trust that A will be alright. I would think differently when A would go for some extreme ...


3

First we need to define "a bit of everything" and "balanced life". I'll go with the following definition: "a bit of everything" means to include almost every product on a periodic basis. "balanced life" only concerns physical health induced by nutrition. Now for the social argument: People who bring up this argument, usually want to see you struggle ...


2

As with the other comments and answers, it is your house, your party, basically your rules! However that comes across as a bit harsh when put like that. Most reasonable people will not have a problem with your requirements - in fact it is a perfect opportunity to educate them. Meat eaters often scoff at vegetarians, and vegans - mainly through ignorance ...


2

An example I usually call for when faced with this situation is responding "If you would invite people from a place where they eat dog and cat as much as they eat pork, would you serve dog and cat, or would you restrict your food options to those that you find appropriate yourself?". That usually does the trick. People who eat meat, invariably also eat non-...


2

Showing commitment has been important in dealing with family pressure. While transitioning, I would be a little flexible with things like dairy. This led to my family not taking my position seriously. Not cheating on my vegan diet, putting in effort to bring vegan options to a dinner when I know there won't be one, and responding firmly with my position has ...


2

In case you need to bring out the heavy artillery: Make them support their decision to buy (or cause the purchase of) "products" that are directly linked to heavy suffering. Do not use the term "product" in such discussions - while the vegetarian spectrum loves the term "animal products" for being so all-encompassing, it affirms the belief that animals are ...


2

When I was in a similar situation to you I'd reflect on why I've become a vegetarian/vegan I'd need to be able to say to my family the truth about my decision to eat only vegetarian/vegan food. As a suggestion I'd first look around the table for foods which I could eat if I found nothing then I'd tell as many people as I could politely that I want to please ...


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