29

Source: Hidden Animal Ingredients in Foods (dummies.com), slightly modified and extended. Can be vegan, or animal based: Glucose (dextrose) - Animal tissues and fluids (some glucose can come from fruits) Glycerides (mono-, di-, and triglycerides) - Glycerol from animal fats or plants Lactic acid - An acid formed by bacteria acting on sugar, ...


10

To me, veganism is primarily an ethical position that aims to create a world where animals are used as little as possible. Based on this, if a company doesn't intend to use animal products in their product, aren't paying the animal agriculture industries, and aren't sending the message that animal products are required to make something tasty, I consider ...


9

In addition to those listed above: Some flavour enhancers. While MSG and its derivatives are considered usually plant based, this is not the case with guanylic or inosinic acid compounds, which are often made from meat or fish extracts. Vitamin fortifications in drinks - fish-based carrier substances are often not listed since they are considered a part of ...


8

Assuming that veganism, roughly speaking, is a lifestyle that aims to not support animal exploitation, I would say that these products are vegan. The particles of milk that may end up on the products are not giving any funding to the dairy industry that produced them, unlike products whose ingredients directly contain dairy.


7

Could it be the same about vegan products? Well, yes. Corruption is something that has always existed among us humans. There is nothing we can do to be 100% sure, all we can is learn from our mistakes and do better. Is there local or worldwide certification labels that ensure a product is really vegan? The Vegan Action Foundation has a label for vegan ...


6

**UPDATE, based on factual inaccuracy in the original answer this has been edited. There is some confusion online about the sources of cholesterol, which can come in dietary form through animal or dairy products, or can be made internally by one's own body, for example when processing trans fats: livekindly.co: Trans fat is added to processed foods ...


6

It is not easy to tell if a candle is vegan because usually there is not a lot of information available about the ingredients. As was mentioned earlier in a comment candles can be made out of paraffin which is a petroleum derivate; most of the cheapest ones are going to be made of that, or of soy wax for instance. On the other hand, the "premium" stuff is ...


6

As for a standard way, I am not aware of there being any that is agreed upon by everyone, but from my experience, vegetarian V is usually written as a plain V in green (or with green background) and vegan V is usually written with a leaf sprouting from one or both of the arms of said letter. Vegetarian society logo: Vegan society logo: And vegan labels ...


6

The E stands for Europe so this advice is valid for all the EU. Here or here you can find a list of those E numbers that are not vegetarian/vegan and here you can find another which also specifies the different functions of the veg-friendly ones.


5

The answer to the question would be largely the same as for identifying vegan anything. First, look for the vegan label on the package. Usually this is either a nice green V, even nicer animal picture or, as Zanna suggested, this logo. Make sure this does not mean Suitable for vegetarians as this still may (and probably will) not be vegan. If you could ...


5

If you're just buying at the supermarket, you really can't know. There are lots of hidden animal products, especially in supplements. My advice would be to purchase them online from an all vegan website. That way you'll know they're vegan. Otherwise make sure the supplement specifically says vegan on it.


5

I think that for such labels, contacting associations could be a start. Creating a label is certainly a lot of work since you have to create all the rules that will reign over a veg*n product and make it strong and famous so that it will be a positive differentiation for goods producers and customers. That's why think associations are the place where a veg*...


5

There is no standard way. Leon and other restaurants I have seen use V for vegetarian and Ve for vegan, while Planet Organic and others use V and V+. I have also seen the V embellished with a leaf for vegan, although a leafy V might be used for vegetarian as well. Product packaging, where it indicates vegetarian or vegan suitability always does so in words ...


5

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) doesn't have much (that I can find) guidance for a threshold of dairy content above which it has to be listed on the label. There is, however, an article: What FDA Learned About Dark Chocolate and Milk Allergies (found in this Seasoned Advice question) which provides a summary of information from a larger FDA study: ...


5

Nice question and project @Jobokai :) In your design, I prefer Vt and Vg - easy to understand and remember. If it helps at all, I came across this vector design on 123RF: Hope this helps.


5

Yes, Taiwan also imposes strict vegetarian labelling requirements. Food labelling in Taiwan is very detailed with separate labels for lacto-vegetarian, ovo-vegetarian, lacto-ovo-vegetarian, buddhist-vegetarian or vegan foods. Source: Taiwan. In Vegan Wiki. Retrieved December 5, 2017 from http://veganwiki.info/en/Taiwan Taiwan food manufacturers must use ...


5

In the UK, cheeses made with non-animal rennet (the majority, as you say) are typically labelled in a user-friendly way, including the text: Suitable for vegetarians and in the ingredients we can find the phrase non-animal rennet The use of non-vegetarian rennet is usually denoted, in my experience of asking makers and manufacturers, by the absence ...


5

As for these cereals, the nutritional information you provided does not mention any animal ingredients - you can Google the ones you are not sure about, such as the obscure Color (INS 150d), since these can occasionally be of natural (and animal at that) origin. The information about allergens does not mention milk either. A number of vegan blogs also ...


5

This questions states as a "trick" a common misconception: that plants do not produce cholesterol. This is incorrect, c.f. Cholesterol and Plants, E. J. Behrman, and Venkat Gopalan, J. Chem. Educ., 2005, 82 (12), p 1791. So the converse of the question in fact has a negative answer, namely: foods with nonzero cholesterol may actually be vegan


5

There are a number of animal products or by-products that do not contain cholesterol, but are still something a vegan wouldn't want to eat. A short list of examples which may be in packaged foods: honey gelatin (e.g. Jello, gummy snacks) And then there are the "hidden" animal-related ingredients: some wheat some sugar These lists are not comprehensive, ...


5

That's a great question! And no, foods with zero cholesterol are not automatically vegan. If some product uses egg whites, it could contain no cholesterol, but not be vegan.


4

You need to ask the producer to determine whether any animal-based food additives were used. The rules for the green dot vegetarian mark are defined by the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI). All food is considered vegetarian unless it contradicts this definition: “Non-Vegetarian Food” means an article of food which contains whole or ...


4

I am fairly certain this is merely a labelling oversight. I would consider it vegan and buy it (in fact I do buy the bar I think you are describing from time to time). Many UK retailers do not bother to label their products as vegan simply because of a general lack of awareness about veganism until recent years. Major ones seem to be catching on little by ...


4

The ambiguous ingredient Flavorings is the most likely place to hide milk ingredients, assuming there are more flavours than just liquid smoke. In general, I would trust the large text that says "CONTAINS MILK PRODUCTS" more than the ingredient list, where things are often renamed or hidden behind other names. But the only way to know for sure is to write ...


3

The European Vegetarian Union has put forward two labels, which have already been taken up by many continental European brands. From my personal experience, these labels seem to be the most common ones in Germany and Austria at the moment. The "vegan sunflower" mentioned in another answer is a close second. One downside of the label is that it uses the same ...


3

My answer comes from this French source. If you have an English one, feel free to add it in the comment. Refined sugar: some brand use bone powder to whiten and purify sugar. Gelatin: can be from pork or fruit. Alcoholic beverages (beer, wine, etc...): one of the step in creating an alcoholic beverage involves using finings (either to improve clarity or ...


2

It may also be a financial choice. In many countries, brands have to pay to be labeled as organic, vegetarian or vegan (at least to be labeled with official, internationally recognized labels). The farmer markets of my country are populated with booths of local producers who offer organic, local food, yet they aren't labeled "agriculture biologique" (i.e. ...


2

Short answer Yes, Alice reduces animal suffering by buying animal products bearing this logo Long answer Wikipedia mentions briefly animal welfare as a topic covered by regulation: This agreement covers such issues as foodstuffs, disease prevention and veterinary treatments, animal welfare, husbandry practices and the management of manure. The regulation ...


2

The US does not require manufacturers to label such things. So, unless the product specifically states it is vegan or vegetarian, I would presume it contains or uses rennet or other enzymes for all we know. A simple google search yields a few sites with "safe" lists - What are the Vegetarian Cheese lists? and Are there any Cheeses that do not contain Rennet ...


2

In the UK, it is not mandatory to label your products as either vegetarian or vegan. However, many products - if vegetarian or vegan - will voluntarily state if their product is veggie or vegan friendly, some even go as far to say 'Not suitable for vegetarians' which makes life a lot easier. If a product has a green 'V' this means that the product is ...


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