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Realistically, it is not possible to live in the modern world without being complicit in at least some harm of animals, including death. You've cited one example where, for an individual, it is difficult to avoid (i.e. use only flour-based products where this practice is surely not the case). There are many other examples, whether from medicine (animal ...


6

I was impressed by this panel of 8 vegan doctors explaining why they recommend that even vegans should receive a COVID-19 vaccine: https://youtu.be/GxzereyQPeQ?t=3250 They did not answer all of my questions and concerns (such as: if mice and macaques didn't exist, would these doctors similarly condone capturing random humans and testing on them without their ...


5

I'm not sure that saying that wheat production would require mice to be killed is entirely correct. A wheat farmer would not need rats to produce wheat. If they are present, it's a challenge that they have to deal with. This is why I prefer to stick to the dictionary definition of vegan, which is someone who avoids products where animals are intentionally ...


2

Current information openly available indicates that yes, the culture media used for biosynthetic B12 is vegan. They're cultivated in media that's rich in sugar (e.g. solutions rich in sucrose, maltose or fructose) and fortified with betaine (extracted from beets, mostly) to increase yield. There is also a patent for cultivating them in beet molasses, but I ...


1

Found this on wikipedia: Persistent (or common) figs have all female flowers that do not need pollination for fruiting; the fruit can develop through parthenocarpic means. From my vegan standpoint, eating a fig is perfectly fine. The fruit is there, I did not cause the harm to the wasp myself. Now the problem arises when I plant these specific fig trees, ...


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