13

It's not about your diet as much as it is the farming of the meat. According to this article in the Guardian: The heavy impact on the environment of meat production was known but the research shows a new scale and scope of damage, particularly for beef. The popular red meat requires 28 times more land to produce than pork or chicken, 11 times more water ...


10

TLDR: The short answer is that it's not possible. Greenhouse gas emissions come from a diverse set of sources, and only the weakest targets can be met by focusing solely on one area. Even if every person on earth became a vegan, that would not be enough, although it would help significantly. I'm going to start with a major simplifying assumptions to ease ...


9

Below is a table comparing the carbon footprint of common foods versus driving. For example, the first entry of 91 in the column titled, equivalent miles driven / kg, means that eating 1kg of lamb has the same carbon footprint as driving 91 miles. The 16 in the column, to the right, titled, equivalent miles driven / 500 cal, means eating 500 calories of lamb ...


8

There is an Oxford University study on the Dietary greenhouse gas emissions of meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans in the UK it concludes that ...an average 2,000 kcal high meat diet had 2.5 times as many GHG (higher greenhouse gas) emissions than an average 2,000 kcal vegan diet. It concludes that moving from a high meat diet to a ...


5

See this article: The carbon footprint of 5 diets compared - shrinkthatfootprint.com It suggests that the average person produces 2.5 CO2e a year while a vegetarian only produces 1.7 CO2e a year, and vegans produce 1.5 CO2e a year. Apparently, 18% of global carbon emissions come from livestock


4

In 2006, the UN published the study Livestock's Long Shadow and stated, that the livestock sector accounts for 18% of the greenhouse gas emissions. As stated in the source cited by the questioner, there is an Oxford University study on the Dietary greenhouse gas emissions of meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans in the UK concluding that "an ...


3

The most extensive study and publication on this subject is 2006 FAO's report titled "Livestock's long shadow". In chapter 4 it analyzes the role of livestock industry in greenhouse gases emissions and states it's responsible for about 18% of GHG emissions, more than transportation sector. We can hence infer that stop consuming meat has higher impact than ...


2

I'm not sure about the relative decrease in comparison to driving, but I found this study suggesting that a vegan diet on average cuts your green house gas emissions in half: Scarborough In conclusion, dietary GHG emissions in self-selected meat-eaters are approximately twice as high as those in vegans. It is likely that reductions in meat consumption ...


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