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10

Yes! You're completely safe to blend in the pit in terms of healthiness. However, I make no guarantee your blender won't go kaboom. More information regarding the seeds. Do note that other components of the mango plant can be toxic: Mango stems, skin, and leaves can cause irritation in people who are sensitive to urushiol, the oil that causes a rash in ...


9

Here's what's in 100g of banana according to Wikipedia (percentages based on recommendations for adults) Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz) Energy 371 kJ (89 kcal) Carbohydrates 22.84 g Sugars 12.23 g Dietary fiber 2.6 g Fat 0.33 g Protein 1.09 g Thiamine (B1) (3%) 0.031 mg Riboflavin (B2) (6%) 0.073 mg Niacin (B3) (4%) 0.665 mg ...


7

If it's not wasps it's something else. The vast majority of large farms use various bugs to eat/control worse more damaging bugs, pollinate crops, process dirt, eat unwanted vegetation, etc. It really depends how far you want to take vegan. If you're not OK with a farmers releasing a bunch of bugs to control parasites or harmful bugs, you're ruling out ...


5

According to the Centre for Science and Environment Washing with 2% of salt water will remove most of the contact pesticide residues that normally appear on the surface of the vegetables and fruits ... fruity vegetables like tomatoes, brinjal and okra require two to three washings. 2% is not really salty enough to affect the taste but if you want you can ...


4

There are two arguments against vegan consumption of wasp-pollinated figs: The generic vegan dislike of eating foods which have been produced with the assistance of animals. (Of course not all vegans will object to this, as there are many reasons for veganism.) The specific nature of (most varieties of) figs, which are pollinated by fig wasps who die inside ...


4

I went by lemons as an example here. Lemons have a broad nutritional profile, most of which are in a much higher concentration in the peel. What's particularly interesting is that the peel contains 3 times more vitamin C and dietary fiber than the remainder of the fruit (by weight). While it does contain a wicked high amount of vitamin C by any standards, ...


4

The peel part of a Citrus acutally provide flavour without adding calories (well in reality it add very few calories). Infact the peel is very much used in bakery. Now, I'm not sure the peel of all Citrus is the same. Lime and lemons are widely used, and also oranges are less common but still used. I don't know about other Citrus fruits by the way. Apples ...


3

Banana provides the following for the body: Vitamin B6, Manganese, Vitamin C, Fibre, Potassium, Biotin and Copper. A full analysis of the nutritional benefits of bananas can be found here: http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=7 But, just subsisting on a single food item will eventually lead to death due to organ failures. An adult ...


2

Not only it is safe, but my family has been doing this to make fruit jam for generations now. Orange and lemon peels are a great source of pectin, which makes jams get their jelly texture.


2

Yes, it is safe to eat the mango seed. Often it is boiled, dried, fried and then used as a breath freshener in India. Some people make it into a powder and mix with flour when making chapati. You can also make a butter from the seed and use it for dandruff and other skin issues. Note: the seed must be shelled. Split the hull and you will find a white or ...


1

I've read a lot about the costs and benefits of conventional farming versus organic farming, so I just wanted to share these two credible sources. They address some common myths about organic farming in the US (I apologize if you live elsewhere, as I'm not familiar with these practices in other countries): Scientific American: Mythbusting 101: Organic ...


1

As you state, organic does not mean that it does not contain pesticides. Standards on what organic food means vary significantly worldwide. Costs aside... Organic farming features practices that cycle resources, promote ecological balance, and conserve biodiversity. But doctors say, answering your question There's really very limited information in ...


1

Found this on wikipedia: Persistent (or common) figs have all female flowers that do not need pollination for fruiting; the fruit can develop through parthenocarpic means. From my vegan standpoint, eating a fig is perfectly fine. The fruit is there, I did not cause the harm to the wasp myself. Now the problem arises when I plant these specific fig trees, ...


1

I use an online tool called Cronometer to analyze diets and specific foods for balance. Cronometer helps to compare nutrient values provided by the USDA Nutrient Database with recommendations from the NIH Dietary Reference Intakes manual. The screenshot below is what I get when I put 20 bananas (2.7 kg, or 2420 kcal worth) into Cronometer. This assumes a ...


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