13

This question really made me curious. Where I live (Romania, developing country within Eastern Europe), it's the same: soy milk is (much) more expensive than cow's milk. The price difference has many causes. To name a few: subsidies from the government organic farming is usually done on a smaller scale, leading to a smaller volume of obtained food ...


11

According to this video by MinuteEarth, a grocery bill of $200 including all kinds of food would cost an additional: $10 if not for various forms of government subsidies. $25 if people somehow paid in advance for the health costs of antibiotic resistance and diseases caused by eating animal products. $240 if people paid upfront for the environmental impact ...


9

For the purposes of this answer I'll be using three terms: Animal-neutral businesses are not built on selling or exploiting animals, but neither do they make any special effort to avoid it. Example: a moving company might have trucks with leather seats, but only because it's normal and common in our society. Cruelty-free businesses provide regular goods and ...


9

This is a tricky question. As you pointed out, meat subsidies don't just come in the form of a check written from the government to the meat industries. As well as money, there are the lack of regulations and enforcement, feed subsidies for corn and grain, water subsidies, pro-meat advertising, and other advantages. PETA claims that a $5 Big Mac would cost $...


9

From a sensible capitalist's viewpoint, it should not drive meat demand up as long as you only eat vegetarian stuff, as you noticed yourself. Now real life restaurant owners/managers might not be that sensible, but if they stay in business for long, they probably are to a decent degree and should buy comestibles based on how much is eaten and not how many ...


6

Many of the subsidies are based on rationales that may not really be relevant to how the industry is set up now such as lots of independent small farmers producing output independent of each other. Clearly, in the US, that's no longer the case. I think political inertia and the lack of a political base strongly advocating to eliminate them are why they still ...


5

Here's a more recent article from Smithsonian that agrees with the Slate one. From a working paper written by the Towson University Department of Economics: "Using a database of Peruvian household information that includes crop and consumption information, the economists were able to look at the relationship between rising quinoa prices and what Peruvian ...


4

I think that the most certain way to diminish meat consumption is to inform the restaurant about eating preferences. The larger the group of vegetarians, the greater the effect in diminishing meat consumption. Vegetarianism by country shows that in most countries, vegetarians are less than 5%. So, assuming no other factors are considered (perfect randomness ...


3

Nic, you've asked a number of questions here, but let me do my best to impart what I know. Cattle leather does come from various types of cattle, including calves, buffaloes, and zebus. In no sense is cattle leather a byproduct of the meat industry. While it's difficult to get specific numbers, since the cattle industry is widely known for its lack of ...


2

It is hard to give an exact answer to this question because it is highly dependent of the location, the actual types of food consumed and possible local culture. Short answer: A vegetarian diet should be generally less expensive, if reference omnivore diet includes a decent quality meat. Intuitively, it is generally more expensive to obtain meat at decent ...


2

I hate to say "it depends" but it does. Firstly, on where you are. However, in my experience of New Zealand, European, and Asian countries it can be and may be in other parts of the world. Generally it depends a lot on how you approach vegetarianism, it can be very cost effective. Many low-income countries have far lower meat in their diet than developed ...


2

No it’s a waste product that’s been repurposed. New Zealand has one of the largest dairy industries and only a fraction of the whey produced is used for human consumption (such as cheese and protein supplements) 1. The vast majority of whey is used for fertiliser which would otherwise go to waste. The majority of milk produced is used to make milk and milk ...


2

The vegan YouTuber known as Mic. the Vegan recently posted a video on this subject. Here's a graph showing how many farmed animals would remain if all farms immediately ceased animal breeding but continued with animal slaughter (scenario 3). Under this scenario it would take three years for all the slaughterhouses to shut down, and presumably all humans ...


2

The leather product (ElmoSoft) sold by this company (Elmo) is definitively NOT taken from a cow that died of natural causes. The clearest proof is from their supplier code of conduct in which they clarify that they will only purchase the skin of cows which were bred for food purposes. [Elmo] will deem the products of animal origin ... which have not been ...


1

Yes, it's a waste product that's been repurposed. Repurposed into a product. So this may sound like a trick answer, but I think it depends what you mean by demand. Just because it doesn't make people demand "more dairy please", doesn't mean it doesn't achieve the same end result for the industry. The bottom line for the dairy industry is money in ...


1

For each individual beekeeper, it depends. The price of bee products (honey, pollen, etc.) change over time, and so does the price of pollination services that beekeepers provide. But it seems like pollination currently produces more revenue overall, at least in North America. Today, many beekeepers make at least half of their annual income not from ...


1

I have experience related to this question from two countries: Slovakia and the United Kingdom. In Slovakia, where the vegetarian and vegan products are scarce, it turned out to be quite significantly cheaper to go vegetarian. Although most of my shopping consisted of regular supermarket groceries, I believe this would still be true if I was regularly ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible