30

Consent is one issue, Mothers have a choice, animals don't, we can't ask them whether they want to participate. Milk production involves female cows and to get them you need male cows. Male cows are either eaten or destroyed which many vegetarians and vegans find problematic.


24

Vegans do not have a problem with 'a mother cow breastfeeding their babies'. Vegans have a problem with humans consuming a cow's breastmilk. It is natural for a woman to breastfeed a child. It is not natural, biologically speaking, for a human to drink another animal's breast milk. It is also a matter of consent. There is a lot of death and cruelty involved ...


17

All traditional cheese is non-vegetarian, but some kinds can be made vegetarian. Rennet is a combination of a bunch of enzymes, made in the stomach of ruminants such as cows. It's used in cheese-making to help separate the curds from the whey. It's most often sourced from slaughtering juvenile cows. However, rennet can also be sourced from GMO micro-...


13

This question really made me curious. Where I live (Romania, developing country within Eastern Europe), it's the same: soy milk is (much) more expensive than cow's milk. The price difference has many causes. To name a few: subsidies from the government organic farming is usually done on a smaller scale, leading to a smaller volume of obtained food ...


11

It is hard to find any hard sources for this online and I would very much like to see an answer from a person from the field (or someone with similar knowledge and expertise), but since there is, I suppose, quite a small chance that such person would visit this site and answer this question, I will try to answer nonetheless. The biggest problem with ...


11

According to this Medscape article, vegans and vegetarians children can obtain calcium from various sources such as: fortified soy formulas, soy milk, soy cheese, soy yogurt, and various other calcium-fortified foods Dairy foods are a natural source of calcium for vegetarians and nonvegetarians. Vegans can consume fortified soy formulas, soy milk, soy ...


9

The standard non-vegetarian ingredient in cheese is animal-derived rennet. Non-animal rennet may be used to produce a vegetarian cheese. Sadly it's not yet mandatory in all countries to declare what type of rennet is used in a product. Some shops may be able to help with lists of products, and some manufacturers do label their cheeses accordingly A example ...


8

The essential part of the starter is a bacteria culture (some kind of lactobacillus). Yogurt is always made with a bacterial culture. Bacteria can be eaten by vegetarians and vegans: they are not animals. They are among the simplest life forms, lacking even a cell nucleus (they are prokaryotes). They are far less complex than plants. Countless numbers of ...


8

Although you mention Google translating закваска as yeast, I believe it means probiotic cultures instead. Now, I do not speak or read Bulgarian but I am good with finding patterns and the pattern I found in this word is something that would be translated to speech as 'zakvaska'. If that is how the word is read then I believe it means probiotic cultures. ...


5

In the UK, cheeses made with non-animal rennet (the majority, as you say) are typically labelled in a user-friendly way, including the text: Suitable for vegetarians and in the ingredients we can find the phrase non-animal rennet The use of non-vegetarian rennet is usually denoted, in my experience of asking makers and manufacturers, by the absence ...


5

In the most ethical dairy farm I could imagine while still having real cows and real farmers, but maybe not real economics, the dairy cows are harmed by having to give milk much longer than their calves need. They're milked four times a day. One might expect that they'd need to be herded into the barn each of those times, so that they can be milked, but the ...


5

You have asked about animal cruelty, animal product or something else. I would argue that because of each one of these things: Animal cruelty: To satisfy the demand of our booming population, milk industry is far far away from where it was just a few centuries ago. Milk, primarily intended for calves, is being harvested by machines in an infinite loop to ...


5

Besides the information within the provided answers, there are also other forces in the big picture: Instinct, the breastfeeding instinct exists in virtually all babies and this a powerful reason for the mother. More details can be found in this article: Health benefits - there are many health benefits associated with breastfeeding, as indicated in this ...


5

There are many sources of calcium that come from vegan sources. Soy (soy milk and tofu), oranges, nuts, seeds, leafy greens, and beans all contain good sources of calcium, for example. (1,2) Just eat a variety of fruits, veggies, leafy greens, nuts, etc. and you'll be fine! 1- https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/calcium-sources/ 2- https://www....


4

I wrote to The Vegan Society for reliable information on this subject, and they told me: Probiotic cultures are made in a number of different ways – the best thing to do is to contact the manufacturer and ask them how it is produced. Many of them are produced using dairy as a source, so these would not be suitable for vegans. When I was in China I bought ...


4

From what I read regarding yoghurt production, the main (starter) cultures in yogurt are Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. The starter cultures are used to convert milk to yogurt during fermentation. As others have mentioned, these are friendly bacteria and not an animal derivative. If you are a strict vegetarian like me, then what we ...


3

No, lactose-free milk is not vegan. Lactose-free is regular dairy milk (typically cow's milk) with lactase enzyme added to it. In terms of animal wellbeing and environmental impact it's identical to regular milk. Let's break it down further: LactOSE is a kind of sugar, technically a disaccharide combination of glucose (the most basic sugar) and galactose (...


3

If you only look at the body count: to have milk, there must be a calf. That animal won't get the food it needs (since we are taking the milk) and is slaughtered if it's a male (a female baby cow will become a dairy cow). The veal industry benefits greatly from the dairy industry. So even if your only requirement is no animal death, dairy products aren't ...


2

I was personally concerned about this because as a vegetarian I got a bone density test a health fair that suggested low bone density: -1.5 on the bone mass scale of -2.5 to +1. I increased the amount of calcium-rich leafy greens in my diet like kale, and also added a red mineral algae calcium supplement. I was also shifting my diet from vegetarian towards ...


2

Regarding health: A mother's milk is ideally suited for their babies. The milk of an other species is not. It is now universally recognized that there is no commercial formula that can equal breast milk. In addition to the appropriate amounts of carbohydrate, protein, and fat, breast milk provides vitamins, minerals, digestive enzymes, and hormones. Breast ...


2

The US does not require manufacturers to label such things. So, unless the product specifically states it is vegan or vegetarian, I would presume it contains or uses rennet or other enzymes for all we know. A simple google search yields a few sites with "safe" lists - What are the Vegetarian Cheese lists? and Are there any Cheeses that do not contain Rennet ...


2

Where I worked they used grated part-skim milk mozzarella. Obviously I can't remember the ingridients of the supplier but pricey mozarella's don't have enzymes whereas cheap mozzarella has enzymes. I have never been to Malaysia (using logic - they should use the same business tactics as part of their brand), but with my experience from working in Dominos I ...


2

No it’s a waste product that’s been repurposed. New Zealand has one of the largest dairy industries and only a fraction of the whey produced is used for human consumption (such as cheese and protein supplements) 1. The vast majority of whey is used for fertiliser which would otherwise go to waste. The majority of milk produced is used to make milk and milk ...


2

Milk is recommended, particularly to children, because it is a relatively inexpensive source of fat, protein, and calcium. Many very young children are meat-averse, and vegetable averse, and ensuring they get some milk in can help prevent some developmental problems. That being said, many adults wouldn't get enough calcium when avoiding dairy. Green ...


2

Animal milk, is it healthy? For the most-part, if you don't posess an allergy or intollerance, yes. There are several things in milk, first let's look at the digestibility of proteins: Protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) is a method of evaluating the quality of a protein based on both the amino acid requirements of humans and their ...


2

Humans are the only creatures who drink milk even after the very first years of their life, and they don’t use their own milk to drink; in the dairy industry they force cows to become pregnant all the time so they can get the milk they want, because animals can only lactate after pregnancy. And if you think they let the cows get pregnant by having sex, you ...


2

Ahimsa Milk in the UK operated between 2014 and 2017 and during that time they collected and sold cow's milk according to their Ahimsa Manifesto. However they seem to have suspended their operations for the time being. Calves are kept with mothers and elder cows are retired into a non-slaughter herd when their productive days are over. The retail price ...


1

Yes, it's a waste product that's been repurposed. Repurposed into a product. So this may sound like a trick answer, but I think it depends what you mean by demand. Just because it doesn't make people demand "more dairy please", doesn't mean it doesn't achieve the same end result for the industry. The bottom line for the dairy industry is money in ...


1

There are two different reasons that people might have a bad reaction to dairy products. Some high-fat dairy products (like butter) can be consumed by people who are lactose intolerant with minimal adverse effects. Cow's Milk Protein Allergy When people with cow's milk protein allergy consume any amount of protein from cow's milk (present in all dairy ...


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