28

It would be vegan if its production does not rely on the exploitation of animals. One part of the motivation for lab-grown meat, artificial milk, etc., is to reduce our systematic exploitation of animals, or at least in the marketing thereof. This company does claim that their lab-grown milk is vegan and “kind”. Lab-grown meats are still far from being on ...


12

By definition, vegans do not use any animal product, food or otherwise https://www.vegansociety.com/go-vegan/definition-veganism Veganism is a way of living which seeks to exclude, as far as is possible and practicable, all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose. Although I know many Vegans, I do ...


9

Gerrit's answer is undoubtedly the correct and concise one, but this is such an interesting subject that I have to offer a couple of thoughts. While it might be vegan I think it's incompatible with the vegan ethos, in my opinion. I think it normalises the impression of meat as both food and commodity. There's every chance that this will be part of the ...


7

There is no official body dictating what vegans may and may not eat. So, each vegan needs to make his or her own decision. A very strict line that some vegans that I know take: if some animal material has been involved in the production then it is not vegan. You ask whether it would depend on whether the product originated from animal tissue. This ...


5

Vegan, as I understand it, is about reducing suffering and harm, so the definition of contains animal parts or products falls a bit short here. So for example, I consider eating road kill as vegan, or eating sausage from dumpster diving. I always liked eating meat, the chewing and taste, but went vegan nonetheless many years before for ethical and ...


4

If it took killing to produce, I wouldn't eat it. That would go against my morality. However, there is also the bigger picture here. Millions of animals die everyday just for the consumption of their flesh. If one calf being killed is going to stop many more from not being killed, I can understand why a group dedicated to animal welfare would support it. ...


3

There is no official body dictating what vegetarians may and may not eat. Each needs to make his or her own decision. I don't think that I would eat it since I am quite happy with traditional vegetarian options. However, if meat eaters switch to it then I would be pleased.


2

It depends on WHY you do it. If you are vegan out of concern for animal well-being, then sure, I would say it's vegan if nothing is from an actual animal (i.e. Stem cells, tissues, etc. taken from a real animal). - That is unless they are growing full animals with brains etc. If you are vegan out of devotion, self-discipline, or for religion, then maybe ...


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