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I've recently read an article from the NCBI stating that they are investigating with artificial skins A range of models has been developed, including ex vivo human skin, usually obtained from cadavers or plastic surgery patients, ex vivo animal skin, and artificial or reconstructed skin models. Increasingly, largely driven by regulatory authorities and ...


7

In my understanding they are not considered to be vegan. Vegans, in general, try to avoid the exploitation of animals for human ends. Testing of animals is considered to be exploitation and harmful to animals. It's not in the letter or spirit of veganism, as it's defined for example by The Vegan Society, to buy or use those products, and if they are ...


4

As far as I know, there are no animal products involved in the production of contact-lenses. Whether they are vegan is debatable though and depends heavily on your definition of vegan. The trouble with lenses is that they are often being tested on animals. While laws vary from country to country, there are countries and companies that do not test their ...


3

One of the earliest modern western vegetarians was Thomas Tryon (1634-1703). He wrote many books which were popular at the time. More widespread vegetarianism didn't begin till the 19th century though. The poet Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822) was a well known advocate. Vegetarianism was connected with the Christian temperence movement. It led to the ...


1

I think the most important change in the sense that it has the best ratio of effort/improvement is not a technological one but a legislative one: The results of animal testing should be public, otherwise the test should be treated by law the same as pointless torture (which usually already is illegal). Now they are often company secrets, that's why tests ...


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