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Please proffer OTHER kinds of benefit, not just health. Please don't repeat these three benefits that I identified.

  1. Eating whole fruits can trap morsels between teeth. Then I must floss, especially before meeting clients or my bosses! But juicing has never enmeshed snippets between my teeth.

  2. Undoubtedly it's unhandy to eat whole foods in the car — particularly if the juice squirts out or you drop a sliver of fruit! But you can drink juices.

  3. It takes too much time to prepare and eat all the sundry fruits necessary for daily nutrition requirements! But you can blend all of them into a cup of juice!

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  • first two are not nutritional benefits ... the third one is borderline nutritonal benefit
    – jsotola
    Dec 23 '21 at 16:47
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On the contrary, juicing is... probably not particularly beneficial. You say

It takes too much time to prepare and eat all the sundry fruits necessary for daily nutrition requirements! But you can blend all of them into a cup of juice!

Kind of true if you just blend the fruits (you need vegetables too, and other foods, to meet all your nutritional requirements) - all the nutrients are in there, but juicing as such usually involves removal of the fibrous parts of the fruits, where many of the micronutrients (and the fibre, obviously) reside. But health organisations don't approve of this approach because it blending releases the fruit sugar all in one go, which seems to be bad for health.

Chewing on whole fruit and getting all the fibre isn't just good for your gut; it also helps slow down the absorption of the sugar. Eating an apple produces a small and sustained rise in blood sugar, whereas drinking apple juice produces a brief, high spike.

The UK NHS, which recommends consuming at least 5 portions of fruit and vegetables daily, states that

Unsweetened 100% fruit juice, vegetable juice and smoothies can only ever count as a maximum of 1 portion of your 5 A Day.

For example, if you have 2 glasses of fruit juice and a smoothie in 1 day, that still only counts as 1 portion.

and

Your combined total of drinks from fruit juice, vegetable juice and smoothies shouldn't be more than 150ml a day, which is a small glass.

For example, if you have 150ml of orange juice and 150ml smoothie in 1 day, you'll have exceeded the recommendation by 150ml.

This might be a bit conservative (the guidance has been revised - in the past, a smoothie could count for up to 2 of 5 A Day), but do keep it in mind.

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  • 1
    thanks! I mixed up blending with juicing. I meant blending.
    – user
    Dec 28 '21 at 10:41

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