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I reduced meats some months ago and about a month ago I decided to go vegetarian. My objective is to go raw-vegan in the future.

I have researched a bit and some sources recommend taking vitamin D, probiotics, omega 3, vitamin C, and a whole bunch of other stuff.

I am a little confused and I would like please to know from experienced vegetarians if you take any supplements or not and which ones if any.

If you could recommend where to find a balanced meal plan from the nutritional point of view, it would be very helpful.

EDIT: I am not talking about lacto-ovo-vegetarianism, but more like vegan even I consume honey sometimes.

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    Welcome to Vegetarianism SE and good luck with your transition. While not direct duplicates, you might want to have a look at answers here and here. We do not have a vegetarianism specific answer just yet so I won't vote to close this one, but I guess this might partially be because there really is not that much to consider when transitioning to vegetarianism. – Alexander Rossa Apr 26 '18 at 23:03
  • Are you including eggs and/or dairy in your vegetarian diet? This will affect the answers. – Nic May 16 '18 at 17:11
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I would like please to know from experienced vegetarians if you take any supplements or not and which ones if any

I've lost count how long ago it was that I transitioned to vegetarianism. I transitioned in a similar way to the way you're currently doing, and that's by reducing the amount of meat I was eating till it was virtually none, then completely stopped eating anything that was made with an ingredient caused by the death of an animal. When I started off, I didn't take any supplements, and I still don't (I have taken multi vitamins but sparsely, and never regularly - I still have the same bottle). I was a teen when I turned to a vegetarian diet, and back then I was quite fussy, there was many vegetables that I didn't eat, and I wouldn't touch fruit. Now I eat near enough all vegetables, and a little fruit, but despite this I've always been considered healthy by my doctor (I don't condone not eating fruit or veg, it is essential for a balanced diet).

Here is a question about whether "a vegetarian diet indirectly cause vitamin C deficiency?" - the answer is no, but MHH talks in the answers about how:

vitamin C found in fruit helps you absorb iron found in other plant based food

The question asks "Is there a good rule of thumb for eating correctly?"

The BBC published an article titled "A balanced diet for vegetarians". Within this article, they talk about the suggested intakes of different food groups, and what the suggested portion size of certain food groups are. They also talk about what foods would be good for different meals throughout the day, along with the benefits from certain foods, i.e.:

Eggs provide a good balance of quality protein combined with fat, plus the yolks are a useful source of vitamin D

There's also a lot of meal suggestions.

All of these mentioned should hopeful give you a well-rounded idea of what is needed for a balanced diet. As for

Is it necessary to take supplements when starting with vegetarianism?

As long as you have a balanced diet, the answer is no. The NHS has a Q&A about a vegetarian and vegan diet, including whether supplements are needed. They do warn that:

Vegetarians need to make sure they get enough iron and vitamin B12, and vegans enough calcium, iron and vitamin B12.

Vegetarian foods that contain vitamin B12

Vegetarian foods that contain iron

Vegetarian foods that contain protein

A list of vitamins and minerals and which Vegetarian foods they can be found in.

(All from the Vegetarian Society)

  • If in doubt, consult your doctor. – Violet Flare Apr 27 '18 at 12:59
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    If you see a nutritionist, make sure they know what they’re talking about though. I went to a nutritionist when I first began a vegan diet. She seemed knowledgeable, yet she told me to take Centrum multivitamins, which, after calling the company, I found contains pork and beef in the form of gelatin. (I just called Centrum again to check if they changed to plant-based gelatin, but they haven’t.) She also recommended that I eat miso soup, which almost always contains chicken broth. So, just because someone speaks with apparent authority does not mean they know what they’re talking about. – SquidInc. Apr 27 '18 at 21:38
  • Doctors, on the other hand, as @VioletFlare mentioned, should be able to give you solid advice as far as what nutrients you need. Plus, they'd be able to check your blood to make sure you aren't deficient in certain areas. – SquidInc. Apr 27 '18 at 21:56
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The Vegan Society has a list of nutrients you need to watch out for here. I, also, found this article from Vegan.com useful.

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I think you will need to take supplements for vitamin B12 at least, because it is essential and there are no known plant sources.

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    Can you explain why? – Violet Flare Apr 27 '18 at 12:58
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    I think this answer should do what Violet asks, at least. – Alexander Rossa Apr 27 '18 at 14:46
  • @VioletFlare well most foods highest in b12 are not vegetarian see here myfooddata.com/articles/foods-high-in-vitamin-B12.php Most Vegetarian alternatives are fortified foods – ssn Apr 27 '18 at 14:51
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    There are vegetarian foods that contain B12 "For people not eating any animal products, yeast extract and other fortified/supplemented foods such as breakfast cereals, soya milks, soya/veggie burgers, and vegetable margarines are all good sources." Quoted from the Vegetarian Society – Violet Flare Apr 27 '18 at 14:54
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    Welcome -- can you edit your question to include supporting details? Our site is built on thorough answers, and as it currently stands, this is a little more like a comment. (Take the site tour to get a better picture of what a good Answer is like!) – Erica Apr 27 '18 at 19:06

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