2

So I'm curious about a plant based diet for health purposes, and though the by-product of that step may be great for animal welfare, environment etc.

How committed should I be about products like Wine, or even egg based pasta or things that may contain small amounts of non-vegan products (as part of their ingredients, rather than "made in a factory that processes X").

I may still buy leather goods, or meat based dog food (for the dog!), so avoiding non vegan food on an ethical standpoint would be a bit of a moot point!

Is there a linear scale of health benefits the more animal products you cut down on? e.g. is a 99% vegan who eats an egg a week 99% as healthy as a 100% vegan.. Or does that egg screw you over and you're back to 50% as good.

  • I'm voting to close your question as too broad since it asks generally "how unhealthy are non-vegan products?" Asking specifically about the health implications of consuming a single non-vegan food or category of food (eg dairy) might be off-topic here! But maybe you mean to ask something like how significant will the difference in health benefit be between a vegan and almost vegan diet? See Are there any studies that show differences in health benefits between a low meat eater flexitarian and other vegetarians types? – Zanna Jul 26 '17 at 5:27
  • Fair point.. I guess another way of looking at it is asking: is there a linear scale of health benefits the more animal products you cut down on? e.g. is a 99% vegan who eats an egg a week 99% as healthy as a 100% vegan.. Or does that egg screw you over and you're back to 50% as good.. – Guy Bowden Jul 26 '17 at 10:26
  • Ah ok, I see what you mean. If you can edit to clarify a little, that will be great. I'm retracting my vote as I can imagine suitable answers. Thanks :) – Zanna Jul 26 '17 at 11:34
  • I think this is too broad. There's no way you'll get an all-encompasing list of "this stuff is really unhealthy". You might manage a top-ten most unhealthy non-vegn foods list (at the top of which I expect you'd find a deep-fried mars bar or a twinkie-wiener sandwich), but I don't think you'll get anything exhaustive. – Pharap Aug 10 '17 at 18:34
  • 3
    I think your blanket premise that a vegan diet is more healthy than a mixed diet is wrong. Too many factors go into what constitutes a healthy diet. – henning Sep 22 '17 at 19:43
1

First off: bravo for choosing to go vegan. This choice is absolutely great for animals and the environment!

There is a big difference between being vegan and being plant-pased, which I will try to simplify. Basically, being vegan doesn't necessarily mean that you're eating plant-based, and eating plant-based doesn't necessarily mean that you're vegan.

Plant-based diets are about eating as healthily as possible - which is what leads us to eat whole plant foods exclusively, and exclude animal products and processed foods. However, people who follow a plant-based lifestyle may still wear fur or attend circuses - which vegans oppose due to animal exploitation.

Veganism is about causing as little suffering as possible - which is what leads us to eat foods that exclude animal products. Vegans may consume non-healthy vegan or "accidentally vegan" processed foods, though, such as Oreos. Oreos are not a whole food and would not be considered plant-based.

If you want to protect animals and our planet, go vegan. If you'd also like to protect your health, go vegan and eat a plant-based diet focused on nutritious whole foods.

Happy Herbivore has a post that goes into more details.

I hope that helps!

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.